Fighting in Paradise Author Gerald Horne Headlines Third Annual LaborFest Hawai‘i


FREE PUBLIC EVENT


University of Houston historian Dr. Gerald Horne, author of Fighting in Paradise: Labor Unions, Racism, and Communists in the Making of Modern Hawai‘i will lead off the Third Annual LaborFest Hawai‘i held this Friday, September 19, starting at 6:00 p.m. at ARTS at Marks Garage. The gathering will bring together scholars, workers (both union and non-union), organizers, and interested individuals to offer multiple perspectives of working-class culture and celebrate Hawai‘i’s important labor history.

Dr. Horne’s talk will be followed by that of labor journalist/lawyer Steve Early and a panel discussion. Panelists include:

  • William Puette, faculty director of UH West O‘ahu’s Center for Labor Education & Research;
  • Jonathan Dial, Graduate Student Organization advocacy chair;
  • Jim Dator, professor and director of the Hawai‘i Research Center for Futures Studies, UHM Department of Political Science;
  • Susan Schultz, professor of English, University of Hawai’i at Mānoa

Agenda:
6:00 – 6:30 Reception, pupu and music
6:30 – 7:00 Professor Gerald Horne presentation
7:00 – 7:30 Steve Early presentation
7:30 – 8:00 Panel of students, adjunct faculty, professors, teachers and other public workers respond.
8:00 – 8:30 Ray Catania and Bart Dame discuss the fight for a raise in the minimum wage.
8:30 Audience discussion plus resolutions and feedback for the 4th Annual LaborFest Hawaii.

The event is free and open to the public. There will also be a cash bar at the event.

Buddhist networks amid political transition

fisherFromComrades
NEW RELEASE


From Comrades to Bodhisattvas: Moral Dimensions of Lay Buddhist Practice in Contemporary China
written by Gareth Fisher

2014 | 301 pages | 13 illustrations
Cloth | ISBN 978-0-8248-3966-6 | $50.00
Topics in Contemporary Buddhism

 

“From Comrades to Bodhisattvas reveals for the first time an important and rapidly developing aspect of Chinese religiosity—the rise of lay Buddhism, which takes place in the cracks of China’s strict system of religious control. Nothing in the current literature on Buddhism or on religion in China is comparable to Fisher’s important contribution. His fascinating findings include, for example, showing how a ‘karmic’ morality offers an alternative for people unhappy with the more utilitarian morality of connection-building that characterizes much of life in Beijing. Other sections show counter-intuitively how a nostalgia for some of the ideals of the Maoist period—a sense of community, a commitment to a kind of egalitarian fairness for all, a broadly shared sense of thrift and poverty—can combine with Buddhist ideals to create a critique of the current system.” —Robert P. Weller, Boston University

 

Coordinating history through East Asia’s maps // China, Korea, and Japan revealed

peggCartographic
NEW RELEASE


Cartographic Traditions in East Asian Maps
written by Richard A. Pegg

2014 | 140 pages | 130 color illustrations
Cloth | ISBN 978-0-8248-4765-4 | $40.00
Published in association with MacLean Collection

 

Cartographic Traditions in East Asian Maps is focused on a group of maps from the MacLean Collection, one of the world’s largest private collections of maps. Included are are eighteenth and nineteenth-century maps from the late Qing dynasty in China, the Joseon dynasty in Korea and the Edo and Meiji periods in Japan illustrating late traditions in the region’s history. This book provides some of the particular practices and relationships between text and image in East Asian map making that are unique in world cartography. Often particular map making characteristics are not recognized as unique within their own cultural contexts, and so it is only through the process of comparing and contrasting that these qualities emerge. This survey of selected maps proves extremely useful in revealing certain similarities and distinctive differences in the representations of space, both real and imagined, in early modern cartographic traditions of China, Korea and Japan.

Expressions of place through adornment in Australia and New Zealand

SkinnerAHistofContemp
NEW RELEASE


A History of Contemporary Jewellery in Australia and New Zealand: Place and Adornment
written by Damian Skinner and Kevin Murray

2014 | 248 pages | 228 color illustrations
Cloth | ISBN 978-0-8248-4687-9 | $50.00
Published in association with David Bateman Ltd
Not for sale in New Zealand

 

“While connections in contemporary jewellery practice have been identified from time to time between Australia and New Zealand, this book is the first to investigate in detail their shared influences and values and evolving expressions of place and identity. Informative and at times provocative, Place and Adornment provides both a history and a valuable platform for thinking about contemporary jewellery from Australasia in an international forum.” —Dr. Grace Cochrane, AM, independent curator, writer, consultant.

“A wonderful contribution to a brilliant field, this book is an unexpected and welcome breakthrough. Packed with information, images and insights, its crucial innovation is to consider contemporary jewellery from Australia and Aotearoa New Zealand, neighbouring countries with very different cultural histories.” —Julie Ewington, Head of Australian Art, Queensland Art Gallery

Enlightened phrasing in Zen Buddhist learning

heineZenKoans
NEW RELEASE


Zen Koans
written by Steven Heine

2014 | 206 pages
Paper | ISBN 978-0-8248-3974-1 | $17.00
Cloth (Print on Demand) | ISBN 978-0-8248-3973-4 | $48.00
Dimensions of Asian Spirituality

 

In this compact volume, Steven Heine, who has written extensively on Zen Buddhism and koans, introduces and analyzes the classic background of texts and rites and explores the contemporary significance of koans to illuminate the full implications of this ongoing tradition. He delves deeply into the inner structure of koan literature to uncover and interpret profound levels of metaphorical significance. At the same time, he takes the reader beyond the veil of vagueness and inscrutability to an understanding of how koan writings have been used in pre-modern East Asia and are coming to be evoked and implemented in modern American practice of Zen.