2018 Hawaii Book & Music Festival: UH Press Tent and Author Events

Map of Hawaii Book & Music Festival with UHP booth circled.[UPDATED 5/3/18; 5/6/18] University of Hawai‘i Press will be among the local publishers, booksellers, community organizations, and other exhibitors at the 13th annual Hawai‘i Book and Music Festival taking place this weekend, May 5 and 6, at the Frank F. Fasi Civic Grounds next to Honolulu Hale. Admission and parking are free. Visit the festival website to explore its new mobile-friendly schedule, filled as usual with speakers, panels, and activities. Read the latest news on its Twitter feed and check its Facebook posts to share with your friends and family!

UHP authors on the program this year include Sandra Bonura, flying in from San Diego to present Light in the Queen’s Garden, her biography of Ida May Pope—the founding principal of Kamehameha School for Girls—and Patricia Steinhoff, editor and translator of Destiny: The Secret Operations of the Yodogō Exiles. Each will sign books at our tent, located alongside Honolulu Hale on the ‘ewa-mauka side of the grounds (left side of the map above, or click here for a PDF). We’ll have our latest Hawai‘i titles available at a discount and will offer free US shipping on orders taken onsite. Slightly damaged (“hurt”) stock and a few titles in new condition will have special bargain prices.

The schedule below shows participating UHP-related authors and in-booth signings. Other signings will happen on an impromptu basis, so check with us at the event. We look forward to seeing everyone there!

Hawaii Book & Music Festival posterSATURDAY, MAY 5
• 11:00 am | Makai Authors Pavilion:  HONOLULU Magazine‘s 50 Essential Hawai‘i Books includes readings by Craig Howes and Jonathan Osorio, editors of The Value of Hawai‘i, and Mark Panek, who has two books on the list: Big Happiness: The Life and Death of a Modern Hawaiian Warrior and Hawai‘i: A Novel (Lō‘ihi Press). The complete list of the 50 Essential titles appears in the May issue; read more by Don Wallace about the selection process here and about titles that almost made the list here.
• 12 noon | UH Press tent: UH Hilo professor Mark Panek signs Big Happiness and Gaijin Yokozuna: A Biography of Chad Rowan.
• 12 noon at the Keiki Stage: The Art In Illustration: Caren Loebel-Fried In Conversation with James Rumford.
2:30 pm | UH Press tent: Volcano artist Caren Loebel-Fried signs Hawaiian Legends of the Guardian Spirit and Hawaiian Legends of Dreams.
• 3:00 pm | UH Press tent: Patricia Steinhoff signs Destiny: The Secret Operations of the Yodogō Exiles.
• 4:00 pm | Mauka Authors Pavilion: UH Mānoa professor Patricia Steinhoff speaks on the real-life story recounted in Destiny by Japanese journalist Koji Takazawa.

• 4:00 pm | Alana Hawaiian Culture Pavilion: Dana Naone Hall will be on a panel for her book, Life of the Land: Articulations of a Native Writer, distributed by UHP for ‘Ai Pohaku. Due to the late hour, buy the book ahead of time to sign at her talk.

SUNDAY, MAY 6
• 10:00 am | Alana Hawaiian Culture Pavilion: UHM professor Puakea Nogelmeier, director of the recently founded Institute of Hawaiian Language Research and Translation, speaks on the Ali‘i Letters.
• [Changed to 12 noon on morning of event (was 11:00 am)] | Makai Authors Pavilion: The panel for Ms. Aligned 2: Women Writing About Men (El León Literary Arts) includes Lillian Howan, author of The Charm Buyers and Pat Matsueda, managing editor for Mānoa: A Pacific Journal of International Writing.
11:30 am | UH Press tent: Civil Beat columnist Denby Fawcett signs her book, Secrets of Diamond Head.
• 12 noon | Alana Hawaiian Culture Pavilion: Robert Barclay (author of Melal) and Craig Howes on the writings of Ian MacMillan.
• 2:00 pm | Alana Hawaiian Culture Pavilion: Sandra Bonura speaks on Light in the Queen’s Garden: Ida May Pope, Pioneer for Hawai‘i’s Daughters, 1862–1914.
2:00 pm | [Last-minute add-on] UH Press tent: Lillian Howan signs The Charm Buyers
3:00 pm | UH Press tent: Sandra Bonura signs Light in the Queen’s Garden.
• 3:00 pm | Alana Hawaiian Culture Pavilion: Puakea Nogelmeier and Aaron Sala share their mana‘o on the Hawaiian language version of Disney’s Moana.
                 *  *  *

Broken Trust is Now Available as Open Access

As part of our ongoing open-access initiatives, University of Hawai‘i Press has released one of our best-selling titles in this free, online format. With the encouragement of the book’s coauthor, recently retired UH Mānoa law professor Randall Roth, and with the support of Kamehameha Schools, the open access (OA) edition of Broken Trust: Greed, Mismanagement & Political Manipulation at America’s Largest Charitable Trust is now freely available to download or read on multiple platforms, including ScholarSpace, University of Hawai‘i’s open-access, digital institutional repository; Amazon KindleApple iBooks; and Google Books.  The files can be downloaded and/or viewed at these links:

ScholarSpace:
https://scholarspace.manoa.hawaii.edu/handle/10125/48548

Amazon Kindle:
http://a.co/0tFjGaH

Apple iBooks:
https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/broken-trust/id1289450562?mt=11

Google Books:
https://books.google.com/books?id=z6Y2DwAAQBAJ

The  OA edition has an added introduction with remarks by Professor Roth and the current Kamehameha Schools trustees, and includes Roth’s eulogy for coauthor Samuel P. King, the late federal judge who passed away in December 2010. In their statement, the Kamehameha Schools trustees share their support for the project as a way “to recognize and honor the dedication and courage of the people involved in our lāhui during that period of time and to acknowledge this significant period in our history.” They also emphasize the importance of making this resource “openly available to students, today and in the future, so that the lessons learned might continue to make us healthier as an organization and as a community.”

Published in 2006 and still in print as a paperback, Broken Trust examines the landmark events of the late 1990s set off by the publication of the “Broken Trust” essay in the Honolulu Star-Bulletin that exposed mismanagement of the Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop trust and of its beneficiary Kamehameha Schools. Written by King, Roth, and three respected kūpuna, the essay led to the empowerment of the school’s wider community and historical changes in the selection of Bishop Estate trustees. Release of the book in open-access format will make this history accessible to an even wider audience than previously and facilitate use in educational settings. In addition to primary source documents, educators can find lesson plans, discussion questions, and legal issues at http://www.brokentrustbook.com/.

According to UH Press interim director Joel Cosseboom, “Broken Trust is the first of what we expect will be a growing number of backlist titles that would benefit the people of Hawai‘i and elsewhere by being made available in digital form at no cost to the general public.” He is working with other authors toward that long-term goal.

Marking its 70th anniversary this year, UH Press is an academic support unit of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, founded in 1947 by the Board of Regents. Since its first publication, The Hawaiian Kingdom, Volume 1, by Ralph Kuykendall, the Press has grown to be the state’s largest book publisher and one of the world’s leading publishers of books and journals on Asian, Hawaiian, and Pacific studies, with a global network of publishing partners.

South Vietnamese Captain Tells His Story of Repatriation in Ship of Fate

[This is a guest post that originally published on The Conversation.]

The South Vietnamese who fled the fall of Saigon — and those who returned

File 20170920 16398 vikgg0
Vietnamese at a camp in Guam seeking repatriation, September 1975. National Archives and Records Administration, Record Group 319, Box 19, declassification number 984082, CC BY

Jana Lipman, Tulane University

More than 120,000 people fled Vietnam after the North Vietnamese captured Saigon on April 30, 1975.

This chaotic evacuation has been captured in iconic photos, documentary films and oral histories. How did the Vietnamese seeking safety actually get from small boats or rooftop helicopters to the United States?

First, they went to Guam.

In response to the emergency, the U.S. military established a refugee camp on this small island in the Pacific. On Guam, the U.S. government planned to assess the crisis and process individuals while preparing camps on the mainland for the incoming Vietnamese. However, approximately 1,500 Vietnamese had another idea – refusing resettlement in the U.S. and returning home.

I first learned of these events when I discovered images of the repatriates in the U.S. National Archives and found “Ship of Fate,” the memoir of a South Vietnamese naval officer, Tran Dinh Tru. His story and that of other repatriates shows the real risks of repatriation if there are no guarantees of protection. This is an important lesson today given the U.S. government’s current steps to make it harder for refugees to enter the country.

Captain Tran Dinh Tru

Trần Đình Trụ in Orange County, September 2015. Jana Lipman, CC BY

 

Tru was a respected career South Vietnamese naval officer. In the chaos of April 1975, Tru evacuated with other naval officers, and he organized for a ship to save his wife, who was stranded far outside Saigon. However, the ship failed to rescue his wife. Like many family members across South Vietnam, she was left behind with their three children to navigate the new political landscape.

Waiting on Guam alone, Tru despaired that he would never see his family again.

Tru was one of more than 1,500 Vietnamese on Guam who did not want to resettle in America. They called themselves the repatriates, and they wanted to return to Vietnam for a range of reasons.

Many were young South Vietnamese sailors who were aboard South Vietnamese ships as the North Vietnamese advanced on Saigon, and their captains had directed the ships out to sea and never returned to port. These young men did not see themselves as refugees.

In other cases, older men and women decided they did not have the stamina to start again in America. Others, like Tru, had family members who had missed connections, and they faced indefinite separation.

The repatriates turned to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the U.S. government and the Guamanian public to make the case that they should be allowed to return to Vietnam. They wrote letters to the Guam newspaper and built massive billboards within the camp demanding their return. The UNHCR and the U.S. could not guarantee their safety on return, and so they made no plans for their repatriation. Frustrated with the lack of action, many of the repatriates escalated their protests.

Repatriates have their heads shaven at a 36-hour hunger-quiet strike, September 1975. National Archives and Records Administration, Record Group 319, Box 19, declassification number 984082

 

The repatriates built a makeshift stage. Men shaved their heads in front of a banner that proclaimed boldly in English, “Thirty-Six Hours, Hunger Sit-In, Quiet, Hair Shaving Off, To Pray for a Soon Repatriation.” The repatriates also organized hunger strikes, militant marches through the streets of Guam and eventually set fire to buildings in the refugee camp.

This was a situation no one had anticipated. The repatriates did not want to go to the United States, the Guamanian government did not want them to stay on Guam and the U.S. government did not know what to do. Notably, the new Vietnamese government did not want them back.

The ship of fate

Ship of Fate cover imageIn the end, the U.S. government granted the Vietnamese a commercial ship, the Viet Nam Thuong Tin, to return home. Tru agreed to be the captain due to his experience and skill. The Vietnamese repatriates knew the communist government saw them as hostile interlopers, traitors and possible CIA plants, but they still felt strongly that they must return.

The voyage took roughly two weeks, and the atmosphere on the ship was tense and cautious.

When the ship arrived in Vung Tau, a southern Vietnamese port, the Vietnamese government saw Tru as suspect and counterrevolutionary. They ignored his repeated wishes to reunite with his family, and the government imprisoned Tru in its network of “reeducation camps,” where he suffered for 13 years. These camps punished South Vietnamese men who had fought against North Vietnam and allied themselves with South Vietnam and the United States. They combined prison labor and forced ideological training. They were marked by hunger, indefinite detention, and ongoing physical and psychological hardship.

My research into the limited reports of these events shows that the repatriates’ sentences ranged from months to many years. As captain, Tru suffered their arbitrary brutality the longest.

Tru eventually resettled in the United States with his family in 1991.

It’s worth noting that Tru’s long voyage is unusual. Most of the more than 120,000 Vietnamese who fled Vietnam sought and soon gained resettlement in the United States. President Gerald Ford’s administration allowed them to enter as “parolees” – a loophole in U.S. immigration policy, which did not make provisions for refugees at that time.

However, by the time Tru was released and decided to immigrate to the United States, he was able to do so through the U.S. Humanitarian Operation program. The U.S. government designed this program for South Vietnamese officers and reeducation camp survivors in the late 1980s, and it expedited immigration processes for this population who had suffered directly because of their affiliations with the United States. The U.S. accepted over 70,000 Vietnamese who had been imprisoned in Vietnam.

The ConversationIn my view, the Vietnamese repatriates’ story challenges us to recognize the risks and fears individuals face in moments of crisis, and ponder the difficult decisions that must be made at the end of a war.

Jana Lipman, Associate Professor of History, Tulane University

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

2017 Ka Palapala Po‘okela Awards: UH Press Nominees

June 23, 2017: This post has been updated with the results shown in bold.

Now in its 23rd year, the Ka Palapala Po‘okela Awards are presented by Hawai‘i Book Publishers Association to honor Hawai‘i’s finest books and their authors, illustrators, photographers, designers, and publishers. While previously given annually, HBPA has switched to a biennial schedule, and this year’s eligible titles have 2015 and 2016 copyright dates. The winners will be announced at the awards celebration scheduled for Thursday, June 22, 6 to 8:30 pm, at the ARTS at Marks Garage in downtown Honolulu; the event is free and open to the public.

University of Hawai‘i Press nominees include (listed alphabetically by author’s last name):

The Healers by Kimo Armitage (Excellence in Literature)

The Lives of Hawai‘i’s Dolphins and Whales: Natural History and Conservation by Robin W. Baird (Honorable Mention for Excellence in Natural Science)

Facing the Spears of Change: The Life and Legacy of John Papa ‘Ī‘ī by Marie Alohalani Brown (Winner of the Award of Excellence in Hawaiian Language, Culture & History)

Royal Hawaiian Featherwork: Nā Hulu Aliʻi by Leah Caldeira, Christina Hellmich, Adrienne L. Kaeppler, Betty Lou Kam, Roger G. Rose; copublished with Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco (Excellence in Hawaiian Language, Culture & History; Winner of the Award of Excellence in Illustrative or Photographic Books)

Hawai‘i’s Animals Do the Most Amazing Things by Marion Coste, illustrated by Rena Ekmanis (Honorable Mention for Excellence in Children’s Literature)

Sunny Skies, Shady Characters: Cops, Killers, and Corruption in the Aloha State by James Dooley (Honorable Mention for Excellence in Nonfiction)

Hawai‘i’s Scenic Roads: Paving the Way for Tourism in the Islands by Dawn E. Duensing (Excellence in Nonfiction)

Picture Bride Stories by Barbara F. Kawakami (Excellence in Nonfiction)

Unearthing the Polynesian Past: Explorations and Adventures of an Island Archaeologist by Patrick Vinton Kirch (Excellence in Nonfiction)

Hawai‘i’s Kōlea: The Amazing Transpacific Life of the Pacific Golden-Plover by Oscar W. Johnson and Susan Scott (Winner of the Award of Excellence in Natural Science)

Murder Frames the Scene by Victoria Nalani Kneubuhl (Winner of the Award of Excellence in Literature)

Protea: A Guide to Cultivated Species and Varieties by Lewis J. Matthews (Excellence in Natural Science)

For a Song by Rodney Morales (Excellence in Literature)

Plants for the Tropical Xeriscape: A Gardener’s Guide by Fred D. Rauch and Paul R. Weissich (Excellence in Natural Science)

Bayonets in Paradise: Martial Law in Hawai‘i during World War II by Harry N. Scheiber and Jane L. Scheiber (Excellence in Nonfiction)

Curve of the Hook: An Archaeologist in Polynesia by Yosihiko Sinoto with Hiroshi Aramata; edited by Frank Stewart; translated by Frank Stewart and Madoka Nagadō (Winner of the Award of Excellence in Nonfiction)

A Sky Wonderful with Stars: 50 Years of Modern Astronomy on Maunakea by Michael J. West (Excellence in Illustrative or Photographic Books and designer Mardee Melton for Excellence in Design)

For a complete list of this year’s nominated titles, see the HBPA website.

Best wishes to each of our nominees!

2017 Hawaii Book & Music Festival: UH Press Tent & Author Events

University of Hawai‘i Press will be among the local publishers, organizations, booksellers, and other vendors exhibiting at the 12th annual Hawai‘i Book and Music Festival taking place next weekend, May 6 and 7, at the Frank F. Fasi Civic Grounds next to Honolulu Hale. Admission and parking are free. Go to the festival website to download detailed daily schedules and a PDF of the map, as well as links to the latest news on its Facebook and Twitter feeds.

Attend the presentations by these UH Press authors and follow them to our booth, located alongside Honolulu Hale, for informal signings (times given are for the talks, so signings are about an hour later):
SATURDAY, MAY 6
SUNDAY, MAY 7
Rodney Morales, For a Song (1:00 pm).
Kapali Lyon will moderate a panel on PALAPALA: A Journal for Hawaiian Language and Literature = Palapala: he puke pai no ka ʻōlelo me ka moʻolelo Hawaiʻi (1:00 pm). No signing is possible but come by for information on this open-access journal.
Dr. Billy Bergin, The Hawaiian Horse (2:00 pm).
Winona K. Mesiona Lee and Mele A. Look, the editors of Ho‘i Hou Ka Mauli Ola: Pathways to Native Hawaiian Health, the latest in the Hawai‘inuiākea  series (3:00 pm).
Lillian Howan, The Charm Buyers (4:00 pm). Due to the late hour, buy the book ahead of time to sign at her talk and/or come to her reading on Saturday, May 13, 2:00 to 4:00 pm at Aupuni Place in Ward Warehouse.

 

At our tent we’ll have event discounts on the above titles and many others, and will offer free shipping on orders taken onsite. Slightly damaged (“hurt”) stock and a few titles in new condition will have special bargain prices.

We look forward to seeing everyone at this outside celebration of story and song!

UH Press awarded $90K open book grant

uh-press-mellon-grant (1)

We’re pleased to announce that the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) have awarded the University of Hawai‘i a $90,000 grant to digitize 100 out-of-print UH Press books for open access.

The project is part of the Humanities Open Book Program, a joint initiative by the NEH and the Mellon Foundation. UH Press is one of eight publishers to receive the second round of funding totaling nearly $600,000.

We’re grateful to the Mellon Foundation and the NEH for choosing us for this funding opportunity, which will allow us to introduce our backlist to a new set of readers. Beginning in 2018, the selected titles will be hosted on a custom open-access portal where readers may download them in EPUB and PDF formats.

We also want to give a special shout-out to our colleagues at the UH Mānoa Library, who will assist in the digitization and hosting of the converted books, to our digital publishing manager Trond Knutsen, and to Katherine Fisher, our development and digital projects specialist, who was the lead writer and organizer for our grant application. It is through her tireless efforts that we are able to make more UH Press books accessible online.

Click here to read the complete press release announcement.

Read more about Humanities Open Book Program projects here.