Hawaii Public Radio hosts The Value of Hawaii 2 on Town Square

ValueofHI_editors
EVENT | Radio Show


Today and next Thursday, The Value of Hawai‘i 2 editors Aiko Yamashiro and Noelani Goodyear-Ka‘opua will be back on Hawaii Public Radio‘s Town Square, broadcast live from 5–6 pm (HST), to discuss “Island Style and Youth Activism” with John “Prime” Hina, James Koshiba, and Lisa Grandinetti.

The Value of Hawai‘i 2 collaboration with Town Square and its host Beth-Ann Kozlovich involves a series of four panels that address how we all might work together to create a better Hawaiʻi and assess the issues of Pacific Islander immigration, spirituality in community building, and island-style activism among youths. Since its inception in 1999, Town Square has provided a lively forum for political, social, educational and cultural issues. Listeners are encouraged to join the discussion and provide their own insights.

Links to earlier shows can be found on the HPR website for June 26 (opening overview of contributors from the anthology)and July 3 (“Visions for Pacific Islander Immigrants as Part of Hawai‘i’s Present and Future” with contributors Innocenta Sound-Kikku and Kathy Jetnil-Kijiner and Palolo Pipeline Project’s Kat Lobendahn). The last show will be on July 24, where the editors and some of their authors will be discussing “The Role of Spirituality in Community Building”.

Listen to Town Square at HPR2 channel 89.3 FM.  The show may also be accessed live from the HPR2 website.  For those interested in calling-in during the broadcast, please call 941-3689, or toll free 1-877-941-3689.

For more information about The Value of Hawai‘i 2: Ancestral Roots, Oceanic Visions, visit their website or on Facebook.

Photo Credit: Honolulu Magazine


 

The Value of Hawai‘i 2: Ancestral Roots, Oceanic Visions
edited by Aiko Yamashiro and Noelani Goodyear-Ka‘opua

2014 | 322 pages | 20 illustrations
Paper | ISBN: 978-0-8248-3975-8

Kalaupapa in Ka Wai Ola

KaWaiOla0913The Kepakemapa (September) issue of OHA’s newsmonthly Ka Wai Ola features a review of Kalaupapa: A Collective Memory with material from an interview with author Anwei Skinsnes Law, who has dedicated over forty years to researching and documenting the lives of Kalaupapa residents. An accompanying sidebar on other recent books on Kalaupapa includes Ma‘i Lepera: Disease and Displacement in Nineteenth-Century Hawai‘i by Kerri Inglis. Check out pages 22-23 of Ka Wai Ola by clicking here or link to the complete issue.

As the international coordinator for IDEA – International Association for Integration, Dignity and Economic Advancement, Ms. Law will soon be attending the 18th International Leprosy Congress in Belgium. UPDATE 9/10/13: Professor Inglis will also be attending the leprosy congress.

March 2013 Author Events #3: Kerri Inglis (Ma‘i Lepera)

Kerri Inglis at KalaupapaTwo book launches are scheduled this month for UH Hilo associate professor of history Kerri A. Inglis — one in Honolulu and one in Hilo. Her newly published work, Ma‘i Lepera: Disease and Displacement in Nineteenth-Century Hawai‘i, sheds light on the Kānaka Maoli who contracted leprosy and were sent to the remote peninsula traditionally known as Makanalua, on Molokai’s northern shore. The book offers compelling evidence of how the disease and its treatment altered Hawaiian perceptions and changed the way Kānaka Maoli viewed themselves—affecting their connections to each other, their families, their islands, and their nation.

Both events are free and open to all interested in attending the talk/signing. Books will be available for purchase and complimentary refreshments will be provided.

Inglis-MaiLepera-NativeBksFriday, March 15, 2013
6:00 to 8:00 p.m.
Native Books/Na Mea Hawai‘i
Join us at the newly renovated shop at the ‘ewa end of Ward Warehouse.

Thursday, March 21, 2013
12:30 to 2:00 p.m.
University of Hawai‘i at Hilo, Campus Center 301
The event is part of the monthly UHH English Department Brown Bag series of public discussions.

Next month Professor Inglis will also sign books on Wednesday, April 3, 1:00 p.m. at Basically Books in Hilo, as part of the store’s celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Merrie Monarch Festival. 

Making Sense of AIDS in Melanesia

In Melanesia, rates of HIV infection are among the highest in the Pacific and increasing rapidly, with grave humanitarian, development, and political implications. There is a great need for social research on HIV/AIDS in the region to provide better insights into the sensitive issues surrounding HIV transmission. Making Sense of AIDS: Culture, Sexuality, and Power in Melanesia, edited by Leslie Butt and Richard Eves, is the first book on HIV and AIDS in the Pacific region. It gathers together stunning and original accounts of the often surprising ways that people make sense of the AIDS epidemic in various parts of Melanesia. The volume addresses substantive issues concerning AIDS and contemporary sexualities, relations of power, and moralities—themes that provide a powerful backdrop for twenty-first century understandings of the tensions between sexuality, religion, and politics in many parts of the world.

“This is a powerful and courageous anthology. One of its great strengths is the powerful ethnography of sexuality contained in many of these essays, making it extremely timely. It shows that anthropology is alive, that the work of culture in confronting the myriad terrors of an incurable disease is daunting and fearful but part of the human condition that needs reporting in these societies. The essays are original and in some cases truly unique. Making Sense of AIDS contains extremely valuable, interesting, and important contributions.” —Gilbert Herdt, Center for Human Sexuality Studies, San Francisco State University

May 2008 / ISBN 978-0-8248-3249-0 / $27.00 (PAPER)