Broken Trust is Now Available as Open Access

As part of our ongoing open-access initiatives, University of Hawai‘i Press has released one of our best-selling titles in this free, online format. With the encouragement of the book’s coauthor, recently retired UH Mānoa law professor Randall Roth, and with the support of Kamehameha Schools, the open access (OA) edition of Broken Trust: Greed, Mismanagement & Political Manipulation at America’s Largest Charitable Trust is now freely available to download or read on multiple platforms, including ScholarSpace, University of Hawai‘i’s open-access, digital institutional repository; Amazon KindleApple iBooks; and Google Books.  The files can be downloaded and/or viewed at these links:

ScholarSpace:
https://scholarspace.manoa.hawaii.edu/handle/10125/48548

Amazon Kindle:
http://a.co/0tFjGaH

Apple iBooks:
https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/broken-trust/id1289450562?mt=11

Google Books:
https://books.google.com/books?id=z6Y2DwAAQBAJ

The  OA edition has an added introduction with remarks by Professor Roth and the current Kamehameha Schools trustees, and includes Roth’s eulogy for coauthor Samuel P. King, the late federal judge who passed away in December 2010. In their statement, the Kamehameha Schools trustees share their support for the project as a way “to recognize and honor the dedication and courage of the people involved in our lāhui during that period of time and to acknowledge this significant period in our history.” They also emphasize the importance of making this resource “openly available to students, today and in the future, so that the lessons learned might continue to make us healthier as an organization and as a community.”

Published in 2006 and still in print as a paperback, Broken Trust examines the landmark events of the late 1990s set off by the publication of the “Broken Trust” essay in the Honolulu Star-Bulletin that exposed mismanagement of the Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop trust and of its beneficiary Kamehameha Schools. Written by King, Roth, and three respected kūpuna, the essay led to the empowerment of the school’s wider community and historical changes in the selection of Bishop Estate trustees. Release of the book in open-access format will make this history accessible to an even wider audience than previously and facilitate use in educational settings. In addition to primary source documents, educators can find lesson plans, discussion questions, and legal issues at http://www.brokentrustbook.com/.

According to UH Press interim director Joel Cosseboom, “Broken Trust is the first of what we expect will be a growing number of backlist titles that would benefit the people of Hawai‘i and elsewhere by being made available in digital form at no cost to the general public.” He is working with other authors toward that long-term goal.

Marking its 70th anniversary this year, UH Press is an academic support unit of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, founded in 1947 by the Board of Regents. Since its first publication, The Hawaiian Kingdom, Volume 1, by Ralph Kuykendall, the Press has grown to be the state’s largest book publisher and one of the world’s leading publishers of books and journals on Asian, Hawaiian, and Pacific studies, with a global network of publishing partners.

James Dooley’s Sunny Skies, Shady Characters Triggers Memories and Discussion

NEW RELEASE | AUTHOR EVENTS (see updates below)


DooleyCOVERC.inddSunny Skies, Shady Characters: Cops, Killers, and Corruption in the Aloha State
by James Dooley

A Latitude 20 Book | August 2015 | 248 pages | 20 b&w illlus.
Paper | ISBN 978-0-8248-5164-4 | $18.99
(Also available as an ebook/Kindle)

“Sunny Skies, Shady Characters by James Dooley—Hawaii’s bravest investigative reporter—recounts the secret history of Hawaii that all of us have been waiting for: a book of shocking revelations, featuring a cast of thieves, heavies, enforcers, and yakuza thugs and sneaks who have so intimidated the islands that the truth of their villainy has been suppressed—until now. At last, we know where the bodies are buried, and who buried them.” —Paul Theroux

“The stories recounted here were once front-page news and they lose none of their timeliness in the translation into a book. For those who lived through those times, the book is an opportunity to recall the scandals and scoundrels that infested Hawai‘i, and for those too young to remember, it is a reminder of why a vigilant press is an essential ingredient to an informed public.” —Gerald Kato, associate professor of journalism, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa


Veteran investigative reporter James Dooley revisits highlights of his journalistic career in Sunny Skies, Shady Characters, revealing entertaining backstories on how he chased high-profile scandals of crime and corruption from the 1970s into the 2000s. In the process, he provides an insider’s look at the business of journalism and the craft of investigative reporting. For a glimpse at the people and cases he covers, take a look at the book’s index here.

Although warehouse stock has only just arrived in Hawai‘i, the book has already triggered memories and discussion due to early media attention, especially preview excerpts that appeared in the August issue of HONOLULU Magazine (released in late July). Civil Beat columnist Neal Milner wrote last week, “As Dooley shows, some of the corruption in Hawaii, like [Ronnie] Ching himself, was bloody and sinister, involving the Mob, Yakuza, and pitched battles between rival Teamster Union members. Other scandals like the Bishop Estate and Kukui Plaza affairs, may not have involved violence, but in their own way they were as outrageous, crude and blatant as a Mafia hit.” David Shapiro’s book review in Sunday’s Honolulu Star-Advertiser stated, “his greatest hits were darned impressive, and it’ll likely be enough for Sunny Skies, Shady Characters to join the short list of books considered must-reads for those seeking to understand Hawaii.”

EVENTS (most recent listed at the bottom)
• Author James Dooley will give a Center for Biographical Research brown bag talk on Thursday, September 3, noon to 1:15 p.m., in UHM Henke Hall 325.
• Join us for HONOLULU Magazine‘s downtown pau hana talk and book signing on Wednesday, September 16, from 5 to 7 p.m., at the Hukilau restaurant (1088 Bishop Street). Click here for the e-invite.
• On Saturday, October 3, starting at 12 noon, Dooley will sign at Barnes & Noble, Ala Moana Center, following an appearance at the Perry and Price Saturday Morning Show broadcast live from Jade Dynasty restaurant, also at Ala Moana Center.
• Head over to the windward side of O‘ahu on Saturday, October 10, noon to 1 p.m., for a signing at BookEnds in Kailua (Kailua Shopping Center, 600 Kailua Road).
• On Saturday, November 7, Jim Dooley will be one of a dozen authors signing at the Daughters of Hawai‘i’s annual Book Day at Queen Emma. (Another veteran journalist, Denby Fawcett, will be there to sign her book, Secrets of Diamond Head.)
• Dooley joins two other authors (Kusuma Cooray and Leslie Hayashi) at the UH Manoa Bookstore‘s Preview Night, Thursday, November 19, 5 to 7 p.m.
• UH Press is partnering with University of Hawai‘i at Manoa’s Hamilton Library in hosting a new lecture series, Laha Mau Book Talks. Jim Dooley will present the second in the series on Thursday, December 9, starting at 4 p.m. in room 301.

For further details, please check back on this post or contact Carol Abe in the UH Press marketing department.

MEDIA (see also the above links)
• Political analyst Dan Boylan gives high praise to the book in his October 7 MidWeek column. See page 10 of the print replica edition.
• On Thursday, October 8, Jim Dooley was on HPR2’s “Town Square” guest-hosted by Neal Milner. The show aired live at 5 p.m. HST and is now archived for later listening.
• Click the highlighted text to listen to the interview by Chris Vandercook on the August 25 “The Conversation” show on HPR2 and the hourlong discussion on the August 23 Carroll Cox radio show.

UHP in Washington, DC | Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Conference

82ca886f-033c-47fa-8716-dd8d086db199Native American and Indigenous Studies Association
2015 Conference

June 4-6, 2015 | Washington, DC
Find more information here.
Contact mpd4@hawaii.edu for an editor meeting

 

 

 


 

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Articulating Rapa Nui: Polynesian Cultural Politics in a Latin American Nation-State
Riet Delsing

304 pages
Cloth | 978-0-8248-5168-2 | $59.00


Huihui: Navigating Art and Literature in the Pacific
Jeffrey Carroll, Brandy Nalani McDougall, and Georganne Nordstrom

320 pages
Paper | 978-0-8248-3895-9 | $29.00


The Pearl Frontier: Indonesian Labor and Indigenous Encounters in Australia’s Northern Trading Network
Julia Martínez and Adrian Vickers

240 pages
Cloth | 978-0-8248-4002-0 | $50.00


The Pacific Festivals of Aotearoa New Zealand: Negotiating Place and Identity in a New Homeland
Jared Mackley-Crump

232 pages
Cloth | 978-0-8248-3871-3 | $58.00

New Titles in History and Politics from UHP!

Being Political  9780824839826  9780824838560

The Lama Question: Violence, Sovereignty, and Exception in Early Socialist Mongolia
Christopher Kaplonski
280 pages
Cloth | 978-0-8248-3856-0 | $54.00

Sinophobia: Anxiety, Violence, and the Making of Mongolian Identity
Franck Bille
272 pages

Cloth | 978-0-8248-3982-6 | $57.00

Being Political: Leadership and Democracy in the Pacific Islands
Jack Corbett
256 pages | Topics in the Contemporary Pacific
Cloth | 978-0-8248-4102-7 | $54.00


 

9780824839765  9780824838898  AmitaiCOVER4.indd

Nomads as Agents of Cultural Change: The Mongols and Their Eurasian Predecessors
Edited by Reuven Amitai and Michal Biran
360 pages | Perspectives on the Global Past
Cloth | 978-0-8248-3978-9 | $54.00

Embodied Nation: Sport, Masculinity, and the Making of Modern Laos
Simon Creak

352 pages | Southeast Asia: Politics, Meaning, and Memory
Cloth | 978-0-8248-3889-8 | $54.00

Remaking Pacific Pasts: History, Memory, and Identity in Contemporary Theater from Oceania
Diana Looser
328 pages | Pacific Islands Monograph #28

Cloth | 978-0-8248-3976-5 | $55.00

 


 

The Value of Hawaii 2 kicks off monthly literary series at UH West ‘Oahu

EVENT


(Click image to enlarge)

Reading and Talk Story Session featuring Consuelo Agarpao Gouveia, Sania Fa‘amaile Betty P. Ickes, Dawn Mahi, Cheryse Julitta Kauikeolani Sana, and Aiko Yamashiro.

Thursday, September 25, 2014
1:45 – 3:30 pm
University of Hawaiʻi West Oʻahu Library

ʻUluʻulu Exhibition Space

This FREE event will inaugurate the UH West Oʻahu Library’s monthly literary series featuring role models from Hawaiʻi communities in inspiring and accessible talk story sessions. Light snacks will be provided. Students of all ages are encouraged to come!


The Value of Hawai‘i 2: Ancestral Roots, Oceanic Visions

edited by Aiko Yamashiro and Noelani Goodyear-Ka‘opua

2014 | 322 pages | 20 illustrations
Paper | ISBN: 978-0-8248-3975-8

Hawaii Public Radio hosts The Value of Hawaii 2 on Town Square

ValueofHI_editors
EVENT | Radio Show


Today and next Thursday, The Value of Hawai‘i 2 editors Aiko Yamashiro and Noelani Goodyear-Ka‘opua will be back on Hawaii Public Radio‘s Town Square, broadcast live from 5–6 pm (HST), to discuss “Island Style and Youth Activism” with John “Prime” Hina, James Koshiba, and Lisa Grandinetti.

The Value of Hawai‘i 2 collaboration with Town Square and its host Beth-Ann Kozlovich involves a series of four panels that address how we all might work together to create a better Hawaiʻi and assess the issues of Pacific Islander immigration, spirituality in community building, and island-style activism among youths. Since its inception in 1999, Town Square has provided a lively forum for political, social, educational and cultural issues. Listeners are encouraged to join the discussion and provide their own insights.

Links to earlier shows can be found on the HPR website for June 26 (opening overview of contributors from the anthology)and July 3 (“Visions for Pacific Islander Immigrants as Part of Hawai‘i’s Present and Future” with contributors Innocenta Sound-Kikku and Kathy Jetnil-Kijiner and Palolo Pipeline Project’s Kat Lobendahn). The last show will be on July 24, where the editors and some of their authors will be discussing “The Role of Spirituality in Community Building”.

Listen to Town Square at HPR2 channel 89.3 FM.  The show may also be accessed live from the HPR2 website.  For those interested in calling-in during the broadcast, please call 941-3689, or toll free 1-877-941-3689.

For more information about The Value of Hawai‘i 2: Ancestral Roots, Oceanic Visions, visit their website or on Facebook.

Photo Credit: Honolulu Magazine


 

The Value of Hawai‘i 2: Ancestral Roots, Oceanic Visions
edited by Aiko Yamashiro and Noelani Goodyear-Ka‘opua

2014 | 322 pages | 20 illustrations
Paper | ISBN: 978-0-8248-3975-8