Debut Fiction: The Blind Writer by Sameer Pandya

NEW RELEASE


PandyaCOVER1.inddThe Blind Writer: Stories and a Novella
by Sameer Pandya
February 2015 | 216 pages
Cloth | ISBN 978-0-8284-3958-1 | $50.00
Paper | ISBN 978-0-8284-4798-2 | $25.00
Intersections: Asian and Pacific American Transcultural Studies

This collection gathers together the title novella along with five short pieces that follow the lives of first- and second-generation Indian Americans living in contemporary California. The characters share a similar sensibility: a sense that immigration is a distant memory, yet an experience that continues to shape the decisions they make in subtle and surprising ways as they go about the complicated business of everyday living.

“Sameer Pandya’s stories are fine-tuned and precise, and carry an emotional load that breaks open inside us in ways that are, by turns, delicate and explosive.” —Gretel Ehrlich, author of The Solace of Open Spaces and Facing the Wave

“Pandya writes with grace and authority about characters revealed to us through their fears and dreams, mistakes and successes, longing and regrets.” —Keith Scribner, Oregon State University

Choice Magazine’s Outstanding Academic Titles for 2014 Announced

Earlier this month, Choice, the official publication of the Association of College and Research Libraries, announced their annual list of Outstanding Academic Titles reviewed in the magazine during the previous year. The list represents less than ten percent of 7,300+ books and other media titles reviewed by Choice during 2014. We are pleased to have the following UH Press books recognized for their excellence:

Sears-mockup4.inddSituated Testimonies: Dread and Enchantment in an Indonesian Literary Archive
by Laurie J. Sears

“Drawing on contemporary psychoanalytic scholarship, Sears has produced an important study on trauma, memory, and the mediated power of language. She shows how close readings of colonial and postcolonial literature can be, indeed must be, part of the historical archive.” —Choice (February 2014)

Rujivacharakul_front1-UHP.inddArchitecturalized Asia: Mapping a Continent through History
edited by Vimalin Rujivacharakul, H. Hazel Hahn, Ken Tadashi Oshima, and Peter Christensen
Spatial Habitus: Making and Meaning in Asia’s Architecture
Published in association with Hong Kong University Press

“This is an ambitious historiographical intervention into architectural/art historical accounts of ‘Asia.’ In contrast to studies that take the continent’s boundaries as cartographically or ontologically given, this volume emphasizes how Asia has been constructed and produced since the early modern period. . . . A valuable resource for specialists in art history, architectural history, anthropology, history, geography, religion, cultural studies, and Asian studies.” —Choice (September 2014)

Zhuangzi: Text and Context by Livia Kohn and distributed by UH Press for Three Pines Press, was also recognized as a 2014 Outstanding Academic Title.

Singapore poems, essays, and fiction

starryisland

NEW RELEASE


Starry Island: New Writing from Singapore
edited by Frank Stewart; guest edited by Fiona Sze-Lorrain

2014 | 240 pages
Paper | ISBN 978-0-8248-4797-5 | $20.00
Manoa Journal

The summer 2014 issue of MANOA Journal features work by over two dozen writers and translators. Images in the issue come from several sources: the British Library, National Archives of Singapore, National Gallery of Australia, National Library of Singapore, and contemporary photographers Nina Papiorek, Salvador Manaois III, Peter Marlow, and Stuart Franklin. Fiona Sze-Lorrain served as guest editor.

Find more information on the Starry Island blog.

 

 

Recasting Red Culture in Proletarian Japan: Childhood, Korea, and the Historical Avant-Garde

Perry4b.indd

Recasting Red Culture turns a critical eye on the influential proletarian cultural movement that flourished in 1920s and 1930s Japan. This was a diverse, cosmopolitan, and highly contested moment in Japanese history when notions of political egalitarianism were being translated into cultural practices specific to the Japanese experience. Both a political and historiographical intervention, the book offers a fascinating account of the passions—and antinomies—that animated one of the most admirable intellectual and cultural movements of Japan’s twentieth century, and argues that proletarian literature, cultural workers, and institutions fundamentally enrich our understanding of Japanese culture.

Weaving over a dozen translated fairytales, poems, and short stories into his narrative, Samuel Perry offers a fundamentally new approach to studying revolutionary culture. By examining the margins of the proletarian cultural movement, Perry effectively redefines its center as he closely reads and historicizes proletarian children’s culture, avant-garde “wall fiction,” and a literature that bears witness to Japan’s fraught relationship with its Korean colony. Along the way, he shows how proletarian culture opened up new critical spaces in the intersections of class, popular culture, childhood, gender, and ethnicity.

2014 | 248 pages | 12 illustrations
ISBN: 978-0-8248-3893-5 | $49.00s | Cloth

Scrutinized!: Surveillance in Asian North American Literature

ChiuCOVER3.inddChang-rae Lee’s Native Speaker, Kerri Sakamoto’s The Electrical Field, Don Lee’s Country of Origin, Mohsin Hamid’s The Reluctant Fundamentalist, Susan Choi’s A Person of Interest. These and a host of other Asian North American detection and mystery titles were published between 1995 and 2010. Together they reference more than a decade of Asian North America monitoring that includes internment, campaign financing, espionage, and post-9/11 surveillance. Monica Chiu reveals how Asian North American novels’ fascination with mystery, detection, spying, and surveillance is a literary response to anxieties over race.

Scrutinized! is broadly about oversight and insight. The race policing of the past has been subsumed under post-racism—an oversight based on a persistent visual construction of race. Readers revisit Oriental visions, or Asian stereotypes, and then encounter official documentation on major events, such as the Japanese American and Japanese Canadian internment. The former visions, which endure, and the latter documents, diplomatically forgotten, shape how Asian subjects were and are scrutinized and to what effect. They determine which surveillance images remain emblazoned in a nation’s collective memory and which face political burial.

2014 | 208 pages
ISBN: 978-0-8248-3842-3 | $45.00s | Cloth
Intersections: Asian and Pacific American Transcultural Studies