Accolades for Chef Kusuma Cooray’s Ocean to Plate Fish Cookbook

Cooray-OceantoPlateBOOK NEWS  |  NEW RELEASE


In the Winter 2015 issue of Foreword Reviews magazine, Ocean to Plate: Cooking Fish with Hawai‘i’s Kusuma Cooray is highlighted as one of its Top Ten Picks from university presses. The book is cited for its “astounding array of Pan Pacific herbs and spices that culminate in two hundred flavor-forward dishes, none of which veer toward tricky kitchen-science projects.”

Kusuma Cooray (seated) is joined by UH Press editorial associate Emma Ching, designer Mardee Melton, and promotion manager Carol Abe at the memorable launch of Ocean to Plate.

The recognition coincided with the VIP book launch last month at Kapi‘olani Community College’s Ka ‘Ikena Laua‘e dining room, where Chef Cooray’s recipes were skillfully prepared and served by students in the KCC Culinary Arts Program.

“The diagrams of fish anatomy, the introductory material, and glossaries alone are worth the price of the book. This is a feast for all who want to add more fish to their home menus but aren’t sure how.”— Wanda A. Adams, writer, cookbook author, and editor of the award-winning seafood guide, A Splash of Aloha

Download the recipe for Bigeye Tuna Steaks with Pearl Onions and Cashews shown on the book cover.


Ocean to Plate: Cooking Fish with Hawai’i’s Kusuma Cooray
by Kusuma Cooray
November 2014 | 368 pages
Paper | ISBN: 978-0-8248-3890-4 | $29.99

Food diaspora, translations of home for Asians and Asian Americans

Ku-Dubious Gastronomy
NEW RELEASE | First in Paper


Dubious Gastronomy: The Cultural Politics of Eating Asian in the USA
written by Robert Ji-Song Ku

2014 | 304 pages | 18 illustrations
Paper | ISBN 978-0-8248-3997-0 | $28.00
Cloth | ISBN 978-0-8248-3921-5 | $42.00
Food in Asia and the Pacific

In Dubious Gastronomy, Ku contends that dubious foods like California rolls, Chinese take-out, American-made kimchi, dogmeat, monosodium glutamate, and SPAM (to name a few) share a spiritual fellowship with Asians in the United States in that the Asian presence, be it culinary or corporeal, is often considered watered-down, counterfeit, or debased manifestations of the “real thing.”  By exploring the other side of what is prescriptively understood as proper Asian gastronomy, Ku suggests that Asian cultural expressions occurring in places such as Los Angeles, Honolulu, New York City, and even Baton Rouge are no less critical to understanding the meaning of Asian food—and, by extension, Asian people—than culinary expressions that took place in Tokyo, Seoul, and Shanghai centuries ago.

The beginnings of beer in Japan

alexanderBrewed
NEW RELEASE


Brewed in Japan: The Evolution of the Japanese Beer Industry
written by Jeffrey W. Alexander

2014 | 296 pages | illustrations
Paper | ISBN 978-0-8248-3953-6 | $30.00
Published in association with the University of British Columbia Press
For sale only in the U.S. and its dependencies

 

“The story Alexander tells is a fresh one, intersecting with important themes in Japan’s modern history (from the process of ‘borrowing’ from the West to the growth of the consumer economy) but novel and revealing at every turn. Brewed in Japan is a striking new addition to the field and engages with many of the most widely debated issues in Japanese economic and social history.” —William Tsutsui, author of Banking Policy in Japan: American Efforts at Reform during the Occupation

Featuring nearly 300 pages of text, dozens of photographs and period advertisements, and a vast bibliography, Brewed in Japan is both a close analysis of Japan’s leading brewing firms and a revealing look at the fascinating country in which they do business.

May 2014 UH Press Author Events

MacLennanWith the Hawai‘i Book & Music Festival now past for another year, let’s catch up with a few more soon-to-be-happening author events.

Saturday, May 10, 2:00 pm:

Carol MacLennan will present and sign her new book, Sovereign Sugar: Industry and Environment in Hawai‘i, at Basically Books in Hilo, Hawai‘i island. Please attend if you’re in East Hawai‘i or reserve a signed copy by contacting the bookstore. If you’re not in Hilo and missed her talk at the festival, you can still listen to the Hawai‘i Public Radio interview on HPR2’s The Conversation that aired last month. Holmes-Ancestry_LihueLibrary.indd

Monday, May 12, 6:00 to 7:00 pm:

San Diego resident Leilani Holmes pays a brief visit to Kaua‘i and will speak at Lihue Public Library about her search for Hawaiian identity as told in her book, Ancestry of Experience: A Journey into Hawaiian Ways of Knowing. By including hula as part of her talk, she transforms her presentation into an engaging performance. Listen to the wide-ranging interview that aired April 8 on American Indian Airwaves, KPFK Public Radio.CAMLA-AsianFoodevent

Tuesday, May 13, 7:00 pm:

Robert Ji-Song Ku, author of Dubious Gastronomy: The Cultural Politics of Eating Asian in the USA, will join an intriguing panel at the Chinese American Museum in Los Angeles to explore the growing influence and role of Asian Americans as food trendsetters in L.A. and—perhaps—nationwide.

Mary Sia’s Chinese Cooking Legacy Lives On

Mary Sia at her YWCA cooking classFond memories of grandmother’s kitchen have been brought to life with the republication of Mary Sia’s Classic Chinese Cookbook earlier this year. Two of Mary Sia’s granddaughters, Laura Ing Baker and Louise Ing, will share bits of family history (some quite remarkable), while teaching a class tomorrow using a selection of popo‘s recipes. The CookSpace Hawaii class quickly sold out weeks ago but you can still listen to this morning’s HPR interview with Louise and Laura to celebrate the legacy of Mary Li Sia—hear a mouth-watering description of noodles with Hoisin sauce (find the recipe on page 164 of the cookbook) and match your memories of growing up in 1960s Honolulu with theirs. For another fun blast from the past, see the photo on this earlier post on the HI SPY tumblr blog.

Here’s a sample recipe from page 58 of Mary Sia’s Classic Chinese Cookbook:

BRAISED PRAWNS
6 prawns
4 tablespoons oil
4 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon sugar
1½ tablespoons sherry
1 tablespoon chopped fresh ginger
1 small onion, sliced
1 bamboo shoot, sliced
¼ cup water

Remove legs but not shell from prawns. Heat pan, add oil, and fry prawns until they turn pink. Add soy sauce, sugar, and sherry. Sauté 2 minutes. Add ginger, onion, and bamboo shoot, and sauté ½ minute. Add water and simmer 1 minute.
Serves 2.

Enjoy!

New Edition of a Classic Cookbook

Mary Sia's Classic Chinese CookbookMary Sia’s Chinese Cookbook has been a classic of Chinese cookery since it was first published in 1956. This fourth edition features all 300 of the original recipes, ranging from simple, everyday fare to more elaborate dishes for entertaining, as well as essays by Mary Sia. An all-new food glossary provides up-to-date names for ingredients along with advice on appropriate substitutions and sources for 21st-century cooks. The work also includes an introduction by Rachel Laudan, renowned food historian and author of The Food of Paradise: Exploring Hawai‘i’s Culinary Heritage.

December 2012 / ISBN 978-0-8248-3738-9 / $16.99 (PAPER)