New Titles in Religion from UHP!

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The Halo of Golden LightImperial Authority and Buddhist Ritual in Heian Japan

Asuka Sango
304 pages
Cloth | 978-0-8248-3986-4 | $54.00


Saving BuddhismThe Impermanence of Religion in Colonial Burma

Alicia Turner
240 pages | Southeast Asia: Politics, Meaning, and Memory
Cloth | 978-0-8248-3937-6 | $54.00


Building a Heaven on EarthReligion, Activism, and Protest in Japanese Occupied Korea

Albert L. Park
320 pages
Cloth | 978-0-8248-3965-9 | $56.00


Practicing ScriptureA Lay Buddhist Movement in Later Imperial China


Popular Culture Association | UHP in New Orleans

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Popular Culture Association
American Culture Association

2015 Annual Conference | New Orleans, Louisiana | April 1-4

Contact Acquisitions Editor Stephanie Chun: chuns@hawaii.edu


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Javaphilia: American Love Affairs with Javanese Music and Dance

Henry Spiller

278 pages | 41 illustrations | Music and Performing Arts of Asia and the Pacific

Cloth | 978-0-8248-4094-5 | $42.00


 

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Eating Korean in America: Gastronomic Ethnography of Authenticity

Sonia Ryang

208 pages | 12 color illustrations | Food in Asia and the Pacific

Cloth | 978-0-8248-3935-2 | $39.00

Coordinating history through East Asia’s maps // China, Korea, and Japan revealed

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NEW RELEASE


Cartographic Traditions in East Asian Maps
written by Richard A. Pegg

2014 | 140 pages | 130 color illustrations
Cloth | ISBN 978-0-8248-4765-4 | $40.00
Published in association with MacLean Collection

 

Cartographic Traditions in East Asian Maps is focused on a group of maps from the MacLean Collection, one of the world’s largest private collections of maps. Included are are eighteenth and nineteenth-century maps from the late Qing dynasty in China, the Joseon dynasty in Korea and the Edo and Meiji periods in Japan illustrating late traditions in the region’s history. This book provides some of the particular practices and relationships between text and image in East Asian map making that are unique in world cartography. Often particular map making characteristics are not recognized as unique within their own cultural contexts, and so it is only through the process of comparing and contrasting that these qualities emerge. This survey of selected maps proves extremely useful in revealing certain similarities and distinctive differences in the representations of space, both real and imagined, in early modern cartographic traditions of China, Korea and Japan.

Transitions in faith, times of turmoil in turn of the century Korea

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NEW RELEASE


Eastern Learning and the Heavenly Way: The Tonghak and Chondogyo Movements and the Twilight of Korean Independence
written by Carl F. Young

2014 | 297 pages
Cloth | ISBN 978-0-8248-3888-1 | $49.00
Hawaii Studies on Korea

It was in this context of social change and an increasingly perilous international situation that Tonghak rebuilt itself, emerging as Ch’ŏndogyo (Teaching of the Heavenly Way) in 1906. During the years before Japan’s annexation of Korea in 1910, Ch’ŏndogyo continued to evolve by engaging with new currents in social and political thought, strengthening its institutions, and using new communication technologies to spread its religious and political message. In spite of Korea’s loss of independence, Ch’ŏndogyo would endure and play a major role in Korean nationalist movements in the Japanese colonial period, most notably the March First independence demonstrations in 1919. It was only able to thrive thanks to the processes that had taken place in the twilight years of Korean independence.

 

 

A multiplicity of Korean scholarly disciplines on death’s powerful role

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NEW RELEASE

Death, Mourning, and the Afterlife in Korea: Ancient to Contemporary Times, edited by Charlotte Horlyck and Michael J. Pettid

2014 | 288 pages | 21 illustrations
ISBN: 978-0-8248-3968-0 | $48.00 | Cloth
Hawaii Studies on Korea

 

Contributors from Korea and the West incorporate the approaches of archaeology, history, literature, religion, and anthropology in addressing a number of topics organized around issues of the body, disposal of remains, ancestor worship and rites, and the afterlife. 

Death and the activities and beliefs surrounding it can teach us much about the ideals and cultures of the living. While biologically death is an end to physical life, this break is not quite so apparent in its mental and spiritual aspects. Indeed, the influence of the dead over the living is sometimes much greater than before death. This volume takes a multidisciplinary approach in an effort to provide a fuller understanding of both historic and contemporary practices linked with death in Korea. By approaching its topic from a variety of disciplines and extending its historical reach to cover both premodern and modern Korea, it is an important resource for scholars and students in a variety of fields.