New UHP titles on Mongolia history launch at University of Cambridge


EVENT | Book Release


Join authors Chris Kaplonski and Franck Billé at the University of Cambridge Book Launch for the launch of their new titles from University of Hawaii Press, The Lama Question and Sinophobia. For more information, go to the University of Cambridge website.

Visit our website for more information on these titles.


Sinophobia: Anxiety, Violence, and the Making of Mongolian Identity

Franck Billé
272 pages
Cloth | ISBN 978-0-8248-3982-6 | $57.00

Sinophobia is a compelling, lucid, and enormously insightful account of recent anti-Chinese sentiment in Mongolia, and its findings should resonate broadly across both Asian and Eurasian studies. Throughout, Billé combines careful ethnography and instructive analyses of affect, language, desire, and anxiety. The result is a truly novel synthesis, an important contribution to social and cultural theories of violence.” —Douglas Rogers, Yale University


The Lama Question: Violence, Sovereignty, and Exception in Early Socialist Mongolia
Christopher Kaplonski

280 pages | 6 illustrations
Cloth | ISBN 978-0-8248-3856-0 | $54.00

“This innovative book is the first to investigate state violence in early socialist Mongolia. Through his penetrating study of archives and personal memories, Kaplonski provides an extraordinary account of the brutal repression of Buddhism, along with a new critical argument about how such state interventions can be interpreted. This book is a must for all those interested in the modern history of Inner Asia.” —Caroline Humphrey, King’s College, University of Cambridge

UH Press at the College Art Association Annual Conference, February 11–14 in New York

University of Hawai‘i Press is exhibiting at the College Art Association annual conference this week, February 11–14, at the Hilton New York to showcase new and recent titles from our latest Fall and Spring catalogs. Please visit us at exhibit booth 1404 where UHP director Michael Duckworth will be available to discuss our titles and publishing program.

Highlights from our display include:

Guth-Hokusai'sGreatWaveHokusai’s Great Wave: Biography of a Global Icon
by Christine Guth

272 pages | 70 color and 5 black & white illustrations
Paper | 978-0-8248-3960-4 | $20.00
Cloth | 978-0-8248-3959-8 | $57.00

TheMcCausland-MongulCentury Mongol Century: Visual Cultures of Yuan China, 1271–1368
by Shane McCausland

288 pages, 162 illustrations, 141 in color
Cloth | 978-0-8248-5145-3 | $65.00
Published in association with Reaktion Books
For sale only in the United States and Canada

Davis-PartnersinPrintPartners in Print: Artistic Collaboration and the Ukiyo-e Market
by Julie Nelson Davis

264 pages, 101 color illustrations
Cloth | 978-0-8248-3938-3 | $50.00

Reynolds-AllegoriesAllegories of Time and Space: Japanese Identity in Photography and Architecture
by Jonathan M. Reynolds

328 pages | 23 color and 60 black & white illustrations
Cloth | 978-0-8248-3924-6 | $45.00

Booth visitors can take advantage of the conference offer of a 20% discount and free shipping in the U.S. Free shipping applies only to orders placed at the conference.

Defining space in urban China

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NEW RELEASE


Villages in the City: A Guide to South China’s Informal Settlements
edited by Stefan Al

2014 | 216 pages | 300 color illustrations
Paper | ISBN 978-0-8248-4756-2 | $28.00
Not for sale in East Asia, Australia, and New Zealand
Published in association with Hong Kong University Press

 

Villages in the City argues for the value of urban villages as places. To reveal their qualities, a series of drawings and photographs uncover the immense concentration of social life in their dense structures, and provide a peek into residents’ homes and daily lives. Essays by a number of experts give a deeper understanding on the topic, and help imagine how reinstating the focus on the village could lead to a richer, more variegated pathway of urbanization.

 

 

Chinese painter Qi Baishi, new volume and exhibit at Honolulu Museum of Art

EricksonModernInk
NEW RELEASE and EVENT


Modern Ink: The Art of Qi Baishi
written by Britta Erickson, Craig Yee, and Jung Ying Tsao

2014 | 144 pages, 109 color illustrations
Paper | ISBN: 978-0-8248-4766-1 | $38.00
Published in association with Marquand Books and the Mozhai Foundation

Buy-Now-Button

Coinciding with today’s opening of Qi Baishi’s work at the Honolulu Museum of Art, UH Press is releasing an impressive new volume filled with color illustrations of his work.

Born into a poor farming family and coming of age during China’s century of civil strife, Qi Baishi transformed the elite brush art of China’s literati scholars into a universal art form appreciated by people of all social backgrounds. His distinctly modern art language breaks through class and cultural barriers through use of expressive “carved” brushwork, juxtaposition of vibrant colors against deep and rich ink tones, poetic economy in form and composition, and choice of emotionally resonant subject matter. For these reasons, Qi Baishi’s art is the ideal gateway through which art lovers of any class or culture can learn about the millenia-old tradition of Chinese brush painting.

The exhibition closes on January 25, 2015.

National cinema and utopic vision in Chinese film

wangRemaking
NEW RELEASE | First in Paper


Remaking Chinese Cinema: Through the Prism of Shanghai, Hong Kong, and Hollywood
written by Yiman Wang

2013 | 232 pages
Paper | ISBN 978-0-8248-5107-1 | $27.00
Cloth | ISBN 978-0-8248-3607-8 | $49.00
Critical Interventions

“Yiman Wang establishes new paradigms for studying Chinese cinema. Tracing how films were adapted and remade across borders from the 1930s to the present, the book demonstrates the strong bonds among film industries in the Pacific rim, and especially among Chinese-speaking countries. Wang contributes to the cutting-edge field of Sinophone studies, which challenges the notion of cinemas defined by the nation-state. Wang brings rare expertise as she straddles China studies and film studies, drawing on theories of national formation and film reception. The book relies on rich archival research in China, Hong Kong, and the U.S. and should be read by all interested in the transnational circulation of words and images.” —Yomi Braester, University of Washington