PDX / Montreal / Chicago | Find UHP this week!

EXHIBITS | This Week


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The Association for Asian Studies
Annual Conference

March 26-29 | Chicago, Illinois

Contact our Acquisitions Editors:
Pamela Kelley: pkelley@hawaii.edu and Stephanie Chun: chuns@hawaii.edu

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Society for Cinema & Media Studies

March 25-29 | Montreal, Quebec

Contact Acquisitions Editor Pamela Kelley: pkelley@hawaii.edu

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You can also find us in the Pacific Northwest:

fdaa5cc9-474d-46af-8324-1df076bf4029ACRL 2015 Conference

March 25-28 | Portland, Oregon

Contact Digital Publishing Manager Trond Knutsen: tknutsen@hawaii.edu

25% Off Sale | Hokusai’s ‘The Great Wave’ Goes Viral in Wall Street Journal

Purchase Hokusai’s Great Wave for 25% OFF in our Online Store

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From The Wall Street Journal

How Hokusai’s ‘The Great Wave’ Went Viral

“The Great Wave,” Katsushika Hokusai’s woodblock print from the early 1830s, may be the most famous artwork in Japanese history, and its popularity isn’t cresting anytime soon.

The image of a wave towering over Mount Fuji is the subject of a new book and recent exhibits in Paris and Berlin. It is on view in a show at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art, and another major display is expected at the British Museum in 2017. Starting April 5, the piece takes a starring role in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston’s largest ever exhibition of Japanese prints.

The artwork exists in that rare stratosphere of images that are both instantly recognizable and internationally famous. “The Great Wave” has gone viral over time, first circulating the old-fashioned way—via traders and tall ships in the 19th century. Since then, the woodcut has been called an inspiration for Claude Debussy’s orchestral work, “La Mer,” and appears in poetry and prose by Rainer Maria Rilke, Pearl S. Buck and Hari Kunzru. Levi’s and Patagonia used it in marketing campaigns. It has been preserved in cyberspace as a Google Doodle and an emoji.

“There is no work of nonwestern art that has a comparable level of recognition,” said Christine Guth, author of “Hokusai’s Great Wave: Biography of a Global Icon” released this year. Ms. Guth, who is acting head of the history of design program at London’s Royal College of Art, said the print has been used to symbolize everything from economic power to military threats to natural disaster: “An image that originated in Japan took on a life of its own.”

Sarah Thompson, the MFA show’s curator, said the museum was the first in the world to stage a Hokusai exhibit in the early 1890s.

The show in Boston, which runs until early August, features more than 230 works from Hokusai’s seven-decade career, including illustrated printed books, a long screen painting and paper dioramas. The exhibit, six years in the making, is built on works entirely from the MFA’s collection. It just finished a multicity tour in Japan.

“The Great Wave”— formally titled “Under the Wave off Kanagawa” from the Hokusai series “Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji”—adorns marketing for the Boston show. Inside the exhibit, though, visitors will have to look for it. The work, about the size of a piece of legal paper, will be grouped with the series of Mount Fuji prints.

The image is a mix of east and west—a blending of techniques that Hokusai picked up from Japanese artists and his own knowledge of European prints. The woodblock depicts Mount Fuji, a hallowed place in Japan, but pushes the peak deep into the distance using western perspective. The wave was printed on Japanese mulberry paper but marked by a color new to Japan—a vibrant Prussian blue created from synthetic dye in Germany.

The work was fairly accessible to the Japanese—one scholar has said it went for the price of a large bowl of noodle soup—while the snobbish view of prints inside the country made it easier for the series to travel abroad.


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Hokusai’s Great Wave: Biography of a Global Icon
by Christine Guth

January 2015 | 272 pages | 70 color illustrations, 5 black & white
Paper ISBN 978-0-8248-3960-4 | $20.00 $15.00
Cloth ISBN 978-0-8248-3959-8 | $57.00 $42.75

New UHP titles on Mongolia history launch at University of Cambridge


EVENT | Book Release


Join authors Chris Kaplonski and Franck Billé at the University of Cambridge Book Launch for the launch of their new titles from University of Hawaii Press, The Lama Question and Sinophobia. For more information, go to the University of Cambridge website.

Visit our website for more information on these titles.


Sinophobia: Anxiety, Violence, and the Making of Mongolian Identity

Franck Billé
272 pages
Cloth | ISBN 978-0-8248-3982-6 | $57.00

Sinophobia is a compelling, lucid, and enormously insightful account of recent anti-Chinese sentiment in Mongolia, and its findings should resonate broadly across both Asian and Eurasian studies. Throughout, Billé combines careful ethnography and instructive analyses of affect, language, desire, and anxiety. The result is a truly novel synthesis, an important contribution to social and cultural theories of violence.” —Douglas Rogers, Yale University


The Lama Question: Violence, Sovereignty, and Exception in Early Socialist Mongolia
Christopher Kaplonski

280 pages | 6 illustrations
Cloth | ISBN 978-0-8248-3856-0 | $54.00

“This innovative book is the first to investigate state violence in early socialist Mongolia. Through his penetrating study of archives and personal memories, Kaplonski provides an extraordinary account of the brutal repression of Buddhism, along with a new critical argument about how such state interventions can be interpreted. This book is a must for all those interested in the modern history of Inner Asia.” —Caroline Humphrey, King’s College, University of Cambridge

UH Press at the College Art Association Annual Conference, February 11–14 in New York

University of Hawai‘i Press is exhibiting at the College Art Association annual conference this week, February 11–14, at the Hilton New York to showcase new and recent titles from our latest Fall and Spring catalogs. Please visit us at exhibit booth 1404 where UHP director Michael Duckworth will be available to discuss our titles and publishing program.

Highlights from our display include:

Guth-Hokusai'sGreatWaveHokusai’s Great Wave: Biography of a Global Icon
by Christine Guth

272 pages | 70 color and 5 black & white illustrations
Paper | 978-0-8248-3960-4 | $20.00
Cloth | 978-0-8248-3959-8 | $57.00

TheMcCausland-MongulCentury Mongol Century: Visual Cultures of Yuan China, 1271–1368
by Shane McCausland

288 pages, 162 illustrations, 141 in color
Cloth | 978-0-8248-5145-3 | $65.00
Published in association with Reaktion Books
For sale only in the United States and Canada

Davis-PartnersinPrintPartners in Print: Artistic Collaboration and the Ukiyo-e Market
by Julie Nelson Davis

264 pages, 101 color illustrations
Cloth | 978-0-8248-3938-3 | $50.00

Reynolds-AllegoriesAllegories of Time and Space: Japanese Identity in Photography and Architecture
by Jonathan M. Reynolds

328 pages | 23 color and 60 black & white illustrations
Cloth | 978-0-8248-3924-6 | $45.00

Booth visitors can take advantage of the conference offer of a 20% discount and free shipping in the U.S. Free shipping applies only to orders placed at the conference.

Choice Magazine’s Outstanding Academic Titles for 2014 Announced

Earlier this month, Choice, the official publication of the Association of College and Research Libraries, announced their annual list of Outstanding Academic Titles reviewed in the magazine during the previous year. The list represents less than ten percent of 7,300+ books and other media titles reviewed by Choice during 2014. We are pleased to have the following UH Press books recognized for their excellence:

Sears-mockup4.inddSituated Testimonies: Dread and Enchantment in an Indonesian Literary Archive
by Laurie J. Sears

“Drawing on contemporary psychoanalytic scholarship, Sears has produced an important study on trauma, memory, and the mediated power of language. She shows how close readings of colonial and postcolonial literature can be, indeed must be, part of the historical archive.” —Choice (February 2014)

Rujivacharakul_front1-UHP.inddArchitecturalized Asia: Mapping a Continent through History
edited by Vimalin Rujivacharakul, H. Hazel Hahn, Ken Tadashi Oshima, and Peter Christensen
Spatial Habitus: Making and Meaning in Asia’s Architecture
Published in association with Hong Kong University Press

“This is an ambitious historiographical intervention into architectural/art historical accounts of ‘Asia.’ In contrast to studies that take the continent’s boundaries as cartographically or ontologically given, this volume emphasizes how Asia has been constructed and produced since the early modern period. . . . A valuable resource for specialists in art history, architectural history, anthropology, history, geography, religion, cultural studies, and Asian studies.” —Choice (September 2014)

Zhuangzi: Text and Context by Livia Kohn and distributed by UH Press for Three Pines Press, was also recognized as a 2014 Outstanding Academic Title.