A multiplicity of Korean scholarly disciplines on death’s powerful role



Death, Mourning, and the Afterlife in Korea: Ancient to Contemporary Times, edited by Charlotte Horlyck and Michael J. Pettid

2014 | 288 pages | 21 illustrations
ISBN: 978-0-8248-3968-0 | $48.00 | Cloth
Hawaii Studies on Korea


Contributors from Korea and the West incorporate the approaches of archaeology, history, literature, religion, and anthropology in addressing a number of topics organized around issues of the body, disposal of remains, ancestor worship and rites, and the afterlife. 

Death and the activities and beliefs surrounding it can teach us much about the ideals and cultures of the living. While biologically death is an end to physical life, this break is not quite so apparent in its mental and spiritual aspects. Indeed, the influence of the dead over the living is sometimes much greater than before death. This volume takes a multidisciplinary approach in an effort to provide a fuller understanding of both historic and contemporary practices linked with death in Korea. By approaching its topic from a variety of disciplines and extending its historical reach to cover both premodern and modern Korea, it is an important resource for scholars and students in a variety of fields.