The Art and Identity Crisis of Yasuo Kuniyoshi

Becoming American
On December 8, 1941, artist Yasuo Kuniyoshi (1889-1953) awoke to find himself branded an “enemy alien” by the U.S. government in the aftermath of Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor. The historical crisis forced Kuniyoshi, an émigré Japanese with a distinguished career in American art, to rethink his pictorial strategies and to confront questions of loyalty, assimilation, national and racial identity that he had carefully avoided in his prewar art. As an immigrant who had proclaimed himself to be as “American as the next fellow,” the realization of his now fractured and precarious status catalyzed the development of an emphatic and conscious identity construct that would underlie Kuniyoshi’s art and public image for the remainder of his life.

Drawing on previously unexamined primary sources, Becoming American? The Art and Identity Crisis of Yasuo Kuniyoshi, by ShiPu Wang, is the first scholarly book in over two decades to offer an in-depth and critical analysis of Yasuo Kuniyoshi’s pivotal works, including his “anti-Japan” posters and radio broadcasts for U.S. propaganda, and his coded and increasingly enigmatic paintings, within their historical contexts.

May 2011 / ISBN 978-0-8248-3418-0 / $56.00 (CLOTH)