Indigenous Author Anita Heiss to Speak on September 10 at UH-Mānoa

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AUTHOR EVENT


Writer and activist Anita Heiss, a well-known advocate for indigenous education in Australia and one of the leading Aboriginal Australians involved in a highly controversial legal case related to Australia’s Racial Discrimination Act, will give a public talk on Wednesday, September 10, from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. at George Hall Room 227 on the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa campus. Her presentation will be based on her recent memoir, Am I Black Enough for You?, which tells her story of growing up with an Aborigine mother and Austrian father and charts the development of her activist consciousness, including her involvement in the case. She describes and examines her experiences as a modern woman in a country where ethnic and racial identity politics plays a significant role.

The free event is presented by University of Hawai‘i Press and UH Mānoa Department of Ethnic Studies, with cosponsors Center for Pacific Island Studies, Department of Political Science, Department of Anthropology, and Center for Biographical Research. On-campus parking is available for $6 (after 4 p.m.) or free street parking may be available. Click on the image to read the flyer and see the UH calendar for more details.

Food diaspora, translations of home for Asians and Asian Americans

Ku-Dubious Gastronomy
NEW RELEASE | First in Paper


Dubious Gastronomy: The Cultural Politics of Eating Asian in the USA
written by Robert Ji-Song Ku

2014 | 304 pages | 18 illustrations
Paper | ISBN 978-0-8248-3997-0 | $28.00
Cloth | ISBN 978-0-8248-3921-5 | $42.00
Food in Asia and the Pacific

In Dubious Gastronomy, Ku contends that dubious foods like California rolls, Chinese take-out, American-made kimchi, dogmeat, monosodium glutamate, and SPAM (to name a few) share a spiritual fellowship with Asians in the United States in that the Asian presence, be it culinary or corporeal, is often considered watered-down, counterfeit, or debased manifestations of the “real thing.”  By exploring the other side of what is prescriptively understood as proper Asian gastronomy, Ku suggests that Asian cultural expressions occurring in places such as Los Angeles, Honolulu, New York City, and even Baton Rouge are no less critical to understanding the meaning of Asian food—and, by extension, Asian people—than culinary expressions that took place in Tokyo, Seoul, and Shanghai centuries ago.

Hawaii’s weaving tradition captured in this rare volume

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NEW RELEASE


Ike Ulana Lau Hala: The Vitality and Vibrancy of Lau Hala Weaving Traditions in Hawaii
edited by Lia O’Neill Keawe, Marsha MacDowell, and Kurt C. Dewhurst

2014 | 148 pages
Paper | ISBN 978-0-8248-4093-8 | $16.00
Hawai‘inuiākea

 

Rich with imagery, this extraordinary volume will guide the reader to a better understanding of the cultural scope and importance of lau hala and its uses, fostering an appreciation of the level of excellence to which the art of ulana lau hala has risen under the guidance of masters who continue to steer the Hawaiian form of the tradition into the future.

In this volume:

  • An analysis of lau hala items that occur in historic photographs from the Bishop Museum collections
  • The ecological history on hala in Hawaiʻi and the Pacific including serious challenges to its survival and strategies to prevent its extinction; perspectives–in Hawaiian–of a native speaker from Niʻihau on master weavers and the relationship between teacher and learner
  • A review–also in Hawaiian– of references to lau hala in poetical sayings and idioms
  • A survey of lau hala in Hawaiian cultural heritage and the documentation project underway to share the art with a broader audience
  • A conversation with a master artisan known for his distinct and intricate construction of the lei hala.

Contributors include: Lia Keawe, Marsha MacDowell, Kurt Dewhurst, Marques Marzan, Jenna Robinson, Betty Kam, Annette Kuʻuipolani Wong, Kekeha Solis, Timothy Gallaher, and Kaiwipuni Lipe with Uncle Roy Benham. The volume is co-edited by Keawe, MacDowell, and Dewhurst.

Denby Fawcett Signs Secrets of Diamond Head: A History and Trail Guide, September 5-6, 2014

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AUTHOR EVENT


As part of First Friday Hawaii’s Honolulu Art Gallery Walk, on September 5, from 6 to 9 p.m., journalist Denby Fawcett will sign copies of Secrets of Diamond Head: A History and Trail Guide at ARTS at Marks Garage in conjunction with its current “36 Views of Leahi” exhibit. Presented in the spirit of Hokusai’s and Hiroshige’s “Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji,” the exhibit was juried by Masami Teruoka, who selected the best of the submitted art pieces depicting Honolulu’s iconic landmark.

The following day, September 6, at 1:00 p.m., Denby will be at Barnes & Noble, Ala Moana Center, to again autograph her definitive guide to the volcanic crater’s colorful past. To read more about the backstory of Secrets of Diamond Head, which is distributed by UH Press, see Civil Beat‘s August 21 story and the fascinating behind-the-scenes tour of Diamond Head’s tunnels in the Honolulu Star-Advertiser‘s August 13 feature [login required to read the full story].