Transitions in faith, times of turmoil in turn of the century Korea

youngEasternLearning
NEW RELEASE


Eastern Learning and the Heavenly Way: The Tonghak and Chondogyo Movements and the Twilight of Korean Independence
written by Carl F. Young

2014 | 297 pages
Cloth | ISBN 978-0-8248-3888-1 | $49.00
Hawaii Studies on Korea

It was in this context of social change and an increasingly perilous international situation that Tonghak rebuilt itself, emerging as Ch’ŏndogyo (Teaching of the Heavenly Way) in 1906. During the years before Japan’s annexation of Korea in 1910, Ch’ŏndogyo continued to evolve by engaging with new currents in social and political thought, strengthening its institutions, and using new communication technologies to spread its religious and political message. In spite of Korea’s loss of independence, Ch’ŏndogyo would endure and play a major role in Korean nationalist movements in the Japanese colonial period, most notably the March First independence demonstrations in 1919. It was only able to thrive thanks to the processes that had taken place in the twilight years of Korean independence.

 

 

Contemporary thoughts on Monastic Buddhism

schopenBuddhistNuns
NEW RELEASE


Buddhist Nuns, Monks, and Other Worldly Matters: Recent Papers on Monastic Buddhism in India
written by Gregory Schopen

2014 | 480 pages
Cloth | ISBN 978-0-8248-3880-5 | $70.00
Paper | ISBN 978-0-8248-3882-2 | $36.00
Studies in the Buddhist Traditions

“Gregory Schopen is undeniably one of the most important contributors to the evolving understanding of Indian Mahāyāna Buddhism. His challenging and rigorous scholarship is accomplished not only by means of canonical textual analysis, but by studies of art, inscriptions, and other material culture as well.” —Studies in Religion/Sciences Religieuses

Discretion’s consequence in Shin Buddhism

chilsonSecrecysPower
NEW RELEASE


Secrecy’s Power: Covert Shin Buddhists in Japan and Contraditions of Concealment
written by Clark Chilson

2014 | 235 pages
Cloth | ISBN 978-0-8248-3839-3 | $42.00
Nanzan Library of Asian Religion and Culture


Drawing on historical and ethnographic sources, as well as fieldwork among covert Shin Buddhists in central Japan, Secrecy’s Power introduces the histories, doctrines, and practices of different covert Shin Buddhists. It shows how, despite assumptions to the contrary, secrecy has been a significant part of Shin’s history since the thirteenth century, when Shinran disowned his eldest son for claiming secret knowledge. The work also demonstrates how secrecy in Shin has long been both a source of conflict and a response to it.

 

Encountering Modernity: Christianity in East Asia and Asian America

ParkCOVER5.inddThe story of Catholicism and Protestantism in China, Japan, and Korea has been told in great detail. The existing literature is especially rich in documenting church and missionary activities as well as how varied regions and cultures have translated Christian ideas and practices. Less evident, however, are studies that contextualize Christianity within the larger economic, political, social, and cultural developments in each of the three countries and its diasporas.

The contributors to Encountering Modernity address such concerns and collectively provide insights into Christianity’s role in the development of East Asia and as it took shape among East Asians in the United States. The work brings together studies of Christianity in China, Taiwan, Korea, and Japan and its diasporas to expand the field through new angles of vision and interpretation. By moving beyond issues of missiology and church history, it asks how Christianity represented an encounter with modernity that set into motion tremendous changes throughout East Asia and in transnational diasporic communities in the United States.

Edited by Albert L. Park and David K. Yoo

2014 | 264 pages | 7 illustrations
ISBN: 978-0-8248-3947-5 | $42.00s | Cloth
Intersections: Asian and Pacific American Transcultural Studies

 

Reflections of a Zen Buddhist Nun: Essays by Zen Master Kim Iryop

Kim-ReflectionsJACKETfront.pdfThe life and work of Kim Iryŏp (1896–1971) bear witness to Korea’s encounter with modernity. A prolific writer, Iryŏp reflected on identity and existential loneliness in her poems, short stories, and autobiographical essays. As a pioneering feminist intellectual, she dedicated herself to gender issues and understanding the changing role of women in Korean society. As an influential Buddhist nun, she examined religious teachings and strove to interpret modern human existence through a religious world view. Originally published in Korea when Iryŏp was in her sixties, Reflections of a Zen Buddhist Nun (Ŏnŭ sudoin ŭi hoesang) makes available for the first time in English a rich, intimate, and unfailingly candid source of material with which to understand modern Korea, Korean women, and Korean Buddhism. 

Throughout her writing, Iryŏp poses such questions as: How does one come to terms with one’s identity? What is the meaning of revolt and what are its limitations? How do we understand the different dimensions of love in the context of Buddhist teachings? What is Buddhist awakening? How do we attain it? How do we understand God and the relationship between good and evil? What is the meaning of religious practice in our time? We see through her thought and life experiences the co-existence of seemingly conflicting ideas and ideals—Christianity and Buddhism, sexual liberalism and religious celibacy, among others.

This volume challenges readers with her creative interpretations of Buddhist doctrine and her reflections on the meaning of Buddhist practice. In the process she offers insight into a time when the ideas and contributions of women to twentieth-century Korean society and intellectual life were just beginning to emerge from the shadows, where they had been obscured in the name of modernization and nation-building.

Written by Kim Iryŏp
Translated by Jin Y. Park

2014 | 328 pages
Cloth ISBN 978-0-8248-3878-2, $49.00

Korean Classics Library: Philosophy and Religion