Connective history in the Pacific

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NEW RELEASE


Transpacific Studies: Framing an Emerging Field
edited by Janet Hoskins and Viet Thanh Nguyen

2014 | 236 pages
Paper | ISBN 978-0-8248-3998-7 | $25.00
Cloth (Print on Demand) | ISBN 978-0-8248-3994-9 | $56.00
Intersections: Asian and Pacific American Transcultural Studies

 

Recognizing the increasing importance of the transpacific as a word and concept, this anthology proposes a framework for transpacific studies that examines the flows of culture, capital, ideas, and labor across the Pacific. These flows involve Asia, the Americas, and the Pacific Islands. Transpacific studies sheds light on the cultural and political movements, artistic works, and ideas that have arisen to contest state, corporate, and military ambitions. In sum, the transpacific as a concept illuminates how flows across the Pacific can be harnessed for purposes of both domination and resistance.

 

Susan Scott Signs Call Me Captain before Another Sailing Adventure

NEW RELEASE and AUTHOR EVENT


Honolulu Star-Advertiser “Ocean Watch” columnist Susan Scott will appear at BookEnds in Kailua on Saturday, September 27, noon to 1:00 p.m., to sign her newest book, Call Me Captain: A Memoir of a Woman at Sea. This will be a good time to catch her before she leaves a few days later on a sail from New Caledonia to Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, then on to Palau to lead a snorkeling and natural history tour for the Oceanic Society. She’ll return to Hawai‘i in mid-November for the holidays and new year, with a West Coast book tour to follow in February.

Quite different from Susan’s previous guidebooks on Hawai‘i’s marine life, Call Me Captain is a tale of self-discovery when she faces a turning point in her life and marriage and decides to leave everything behind to sail to Palmyra Atoll to work as a volunteer biologist. Follow Susan as she writes about swimming with manta rays, kayaking with sharks, and sailing with whales and dolphins. Her memoir is a romance, a harrowing sea tale, and a personal account of nature’s power to put life in perspective.


Call Me Captain: A Memoir of a Woman at Sea
Susan Scott
2014 | 336 pages | A Latitude 20 Book
Paper | ISBN: 978-0-8248-3981-9 | $19.99

Expressions of place through adornment in Australia and New Zealand

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NEW RELEASE


A History of Contemporary Jewellery in Australia and New Zealand: Place and Adornment
written by Damian Skinner and Kevin Murray

2014 | 248 pages | 228 color illustrations
Cloth | ISBN 978-0-8248-4687-9 | $50.00
Published in association with David Bateman Ltd
Not for sale in New Zealand

 

“While connections in contemporary jewellery practice have been identified from time to time between Australia and New Zealand, this book is the first to investigate in detail their shared influences and values and evolving expressions of place and identity. Informative and at times provocative, Place and Adornment provides both a history and a valuable platform for thinking about contemporary jewellery from Australasia in an international forum.” —Dr. Grace Cochrane, AM, independent curator, writer, consultant.

“A wonderful contribution to a brilliant field, this book is an unexpected and welcome breakthrough. Packed with information, images and insights, its crucial innovation is to consider contemporary jewellery from Australia and Aotearoa New Zealand, neighbouring countries with very different cultural histories.” —Julie Ewington, Head of Australian Art, Queensland Art Gallery

Indigenous Author Anita Heiss to Speak on September 10 at UH-Mānoa

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AUTHOR EVENT


Writer and activist Anita Heiss, a well-known advocate for indigenous education in Australia and one of the leading Aboriginal Australians involved in a highly controversial legal case related to Australia’s Racial Discrimination Act, will give a public talk on Wednesday, September 10, from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. at George Hall Room 227 on the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa campus. Her presentation will be based on her recent memoir, Am I Black Enough for You?, which tells her story of growing up with an Aborigine mother and Austrian father and charts the development of her activist consciousness, including her involvement in the case. She describes and examines her experiences as a modern woman in a country where ethnic and racial identity politics plays a significant role.

The free event is presented by University of Hawai‘i Press and UH Mānoa Department of Ethnic Studies, with cosponsors Center for Pacific Island Studies, Department of Political Science, Department of Anthropology, and Center for Biographical Research. On-campus parking is available for $6 (after 4 p.m.) or free street parking may be available. Click on the image to read the flyer and see the UH calendar for more details.

Hawaii’s weaving tradition captured in this rare volume

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NEW RELEASE


Ike Ulana Lau Hala: The Vitality and Vibrancy of Lau Hala Weaving Traditions in Hawaii
edited by Lia O’Neill Keawe, Marsha MacDowell, and Kurt C. Dewhurst

2014 | 148 pages
Paper | ISBN 978-0-8248-4093-8 | $16.00
Hawai‘inuiākea

 

Rich with imagery, this extraordinary volume will guide the reader to a better understanding of the cultural scope and importance of lau hala and its uses, fostering an appreciation of the level of excellence to which the art of ulana lau hala has risen under the guidance of masters who continue to steer the Hawaiian form of the tradition into the future.

In this volume:

  • An analysis of lau hala items that occur in historic photographs from the Bishop Museum collections
  • The ecological history on hala in Hawaiʻi and the Pacific including serious challenges to its survival and strategies to prevent its extinction; perspectives–in Hawaiian–of a native speaker from Niʻihau on master weavers and the relationship between teacher and learner
  • A review–also in Hawaiian– of references to lau hala in poetical sayings and idioms
  • A survey of lau hala in Hawaiian cultural heritage and the documentation project underway to share the art with a broader audience
  • A conversation with a master artisan known for his distinct and intricate construction of the lei hala.

Contributors include: Lia Keawe, Marsha MacDowell, Kurt Dewhurst, Marques Marzan, Jenna Robinson, Betty Kam, Annette Kuʻuipolani Wong, Kekeha Solis, Timothy Gallaher, and Kaiwipuni Lipe with Uncle Roy Benham. The volume is co-edited by Keawe, MacDowell, and Dewhurst.