Michael French Smith Writes about PNG on Longitude and HuffPost

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UHP AUTHOR INFO


For travelers searching for books and maps about their destination, Longitude has been the go-to resource since 1999. In the July issue of its newsletter highlighting travel to Indonesia, Michael French Smith’s A Faraway, Familiar Place is the featured book for Papua New Guinea and includes an excerpt from his post that appeared earlier on the Longitude blog.

A Faraway, Familiar Place: An Anthropologist Returns to Papua New Guinea is available at a newly reduced price of $35 from UH Press or the Longitude bookstore (where although the price still shows at the original $52, the new price is in effect).

See also Smith’s article on Huffington Post about the political climate and preferential voting system of PNG.

Hawaii’s Japanese Americans past and present

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NEW RELEASE


From Race to Ethnicity: Interpreting Japanese American Experiences in Hawaii
written by Jonathan Y. Okamura

2014 | 248 pages
Cloth | ISBN 978-0-8248-3950-5 | $42.00
Race and Ethnicity in Hawaii


From Race to Ethnicity resonates with scholars currently debating the relative analytical significance of race and ethnicity. Its novel analysis convincingly elucidates the differential functioning of race and ethnicity over time insofar as race worked against Japanese Americans and other non-Haoles (Whites) by restricting them from full and equal participation in society, but by the 1970s ethnicity would work fully in their favor as they gained greater political and economic power.

A Wiradjuri’s Tour: Anita Heiss Meets Alice Walker at Sydney Festival; Heads to London, Vienna, and Utrecht Literary Events

Alice Walker and AnitaHeiss
Still aglow from meeting acclaimed novelist/poet Alice Walker at the Sydney Writers Festival, Aboriginal author Anita Heiss headed to London to appear at the inaugural Australian & New Zealand Festival of Literature & Arts and promote her latest “choc-lit” novel, Tiddas (Simon & Schuster Australia). After a talk at Oxford, she flew to Vienna, where she was hosted by the Australian Embassy as the featured speaker in their seminar on the Europe-Australian connection and also gave a presentation similar to her TEDx Brisbane talk at Café Prückel. Thanks to the Austrian-Australian Society and our European distributor, Eurospan, copies of the UH Press edition of Am I Black Enough for You? were available for signing.

Next week, on June 11, Anita will be in Utrecht, Netherlands, to give an evening lecture on indigenous literature at the AAMU, Museum of Contemporary Aboriginal Art. Whew! With a schedule like hers, she is already looking forward to a week’s holiday in Hawai‘i this September—we at UH Press are very much looking forward to her visit and meeting her in person, as well!

Am I Black Enough for You? |2014 | 352 pages 
ISBN: 978-0-8248-4027-3 | Paper | $24.99

Uniting the Pacific Rim as the Spanish Lake

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NEW RELEASE

Navigating the Spanish Lake: The Pacific in the Iberian World, 1521-1898, written by Rainer F. Buschmann, Edward R. Slack Jr., and James B. Tueller

2014 | 216 pages | 2 illustrations, 3 tables
ISBN: 978-0-8248-3824-9 | $47.00 | Cloth
Perspectives on the Global Past Series 

 

“The originality of this book lies in the way it recenters both history and geography from Europe to the Americas, from the Atlantic to the Pacific. The authors encourage us to see the early modern world as multilayered and multidirectional. We learn that European interlopers to the Pacific shared pride of place not only with Pacific Islanders, but with Chinese, Burmese, Malays, and other Asians.” –From the Foreword by John R. Gillis, Professor of History Emeritus, Rutgers University

This volume opens with a macrohistorical perspective of the conceptual and literal Spanish Lake. The chapters that follow explore both the Iberian vision of the Pacific and indigenous counternarratives; chart the history of a Chinese mestizo regiment that emerged after Britain’s occupation of Manila in 1762-1764; and examine how Chamorros responded to waves of newcomers making their way to Guam from Europe, the Americas, and Asia. An epilogue analyzes the decline of Spanish influence against a backdrop of European and American imperial ambitions and reflects on the legacies of archipelagic Hispanization into the twenty-first century.