John Rosa Presents Backstory to Local Story, His Book on the Massie-Kahahawai Case

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Please join us on Sunday, August 10, 2 to 4 p.m., at Native Books/Nā Mea Hawai‘i, as UH-Mānoa history professor John Rosa gives an illustrated talk on his book, Local Story: The Massie-Kahahawai Case and the Culture of History. He will discuss how he researched the book and why the 1931-1932 case continues to have relevance in today’s Hawai‘i. While other books have told the “true crime” details of this case before, Dr. Rosa retells the story and shows how this narrative explains the beginnings of a non-white, “local” identity among Hawai‘i’s working-class people.

Light refreshments will be provided at the free presentation and books will be available for purchase and signing. Native Books is located at the ‘ewa end of Ward Warehouse (1050 Ala Moana Blvd.); phone: 808-596-8885.

Read more about Dr. Rosa’s research on the book in Kaunānā, UH-Mānoa’s online research publication. Also, listen to his April 2014 interview on HPR2‘s The Conversation.


2014 | 176 pages | 978-0-8248-3970-3 | Paper | $19.99

Tibet’s complexities chronicled

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NEW RELEASE | Now in Cloth

Voices from Tibet: Selected Essays and Reportage
written by Tsering Woeser and Wang Lixiong
edited and translated by Violet S. Law

2014 | 122 pages
Cloth | ISBN 978-0-8248-4008-2 | $55.00
Paper | ISBN 978-0-8248-3951-2 | $20.00
Published in association with Hong Kong University Press

 

“These essays and dispatches provide an eloquent and unfiltered glimpse into how the ruling Communist Party has transformed the Tibetan plateau through decades of heavy-handed policies.”
Andrew Jacobs, Beijing correspondent for The New York Times

“Violet S. Law’s fluid translations of Woeser and Wang Lixiong’s powerful and deeply humane writings, combined with Robert Barnett’s insightful and elegantly crafted introduction, make for an extraordinarily effective volume.Voices from Tibet is a must-read for anyone eager to learn more about the Tibetan people and their struggles.”
Jeffrey Wasserstrom, author of China in the 21st Century

A multiplicity of Korean scholarly disciplines on death’s powerful role

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NEW RELEASE

Death, Mourning, and the Afterlife in Korea: Ancient to Contemporary Times, edited by Charlotte Horlyck and Michael J. Pettid

2014 | 288 pages | 21 illustrations
ISBN: 978-0-8248-3968-0 | $48.00 | Cloth
Hawaii Studies on Korea

 

Contributors from Korea and the West incorporate the approaches of archaeology, history, literature, religion, and anthropology in addressing a number of topics organized around issues of the body, disposal of remains, ancestor worship and rites, and the afterlife. 

Death and the activities and beliefs surrounding it can teach us much about the ideals and cultures of the living. While biologically death is an end to physical life, this break is not quite so apparent in its mental and spiritual aspects. Indeed, the influence of the dead over the living is sometimes much greater than before death. This volume takes a multidisciplinary approach in an effort to provide a fuller understanding of both historic and contemporary practices linked with death in Korea. By approaching its topic from a variety of disciplines and extending its historical reach to cover both premodern and modern Korea, it is an important resource for scholars and students in a variety of fields.

 

Uniting the Pacific Rim as the Spanish Lake

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NEW RELEASE

Navigating the Spanish Lake: The Pacific in the Iberian World, 1521-1898, written by Rainer F. Buschmann, Edward R. Slack Jr., and James B. Tueller

2014 | 216 pages | 2 illustrations, 3 tables
ISBN: 978-0-8248-3824-9 | $47.00 | Cloth
Perspectives on the Global Past Series 

 

“The originality of this book lies in the way it recenters both history and geography from Europe to the Americas, from the Atlantic to the Pacific. The authors encourage us to see the early modern world as multilayered and multidirectional. We learn that European interlopers to the Pacific shared pride of place not only with Pacific Islanders, but with Chinese, Burmese, Malays, and other Asians.” –From the Foreword by John R. Gillis, Professor of History Emeritus, Rutgers University

This volume opens with a macrohistorical perspective of the conceptual and literal Spanish Lake. The chapters that follow explore both the Iberian vision of the Pacific and indigenous counternarratives; chart the history of a Chinese mestizo regiment that emerged after Britain’s occupation of Manila in 1762-1764; and examine how Chamorros responded to waves of newcomers making their way to Guam from Europe, the Americas, and Asia. An epilogue analyzes the decline of Spanish influence against a backdrop of European and American imperial ambitions and reflects on the legacies of archipelagic Hispanization into the twenty-first century.

Gender and Nation in Meiji Japan: Modernity, Loss, and the Doing of History

KarlinGender and Nation in Meiji Japan is a historical analysis of the discourses of nostalgia in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Japan. Through an analysis of the experience of rapid social change in Japan’s modernization, it argues that fads (ryūkō) and the desires they express are central to understanding Japanese modernity, conceptions of gender, and discourses of nationalism. In doing so, the author uncovers the myth of eternal return that lurks below the surface of Japanese history as an expression of the desire to find meaning amid the chaos and alienation of modern times. The Meiji period (1868–1912) was one of rapid change that hastened the process of forgetting: The state’s aggressive program of modernization required the repression of history and memory. However, repression merely produced new forms of desire seeking a return to the past, with the result that competing or alternative conceptions of the nation haunted the history of modern Japan. Rooted in the belief that the nation was a natural and organic entity that predated the rational, modern state, such conceptions often were responses to modernity that envisioned the nation in opposition to the modern state. What these visions of the nation shared was the ironic desire to overcome the modern condition by seeking the timeless past. While the condition of their repression was often linked to the modernizing policies of the Meiji state, the means for imagining the nation in opposition to the state required the construction of new symbols that claimed the authority of history and appealed to a rearticulated tradition. Through the idiom of gender and nation, new reified representations of continuity, timelessness, and history were fashioned to compensate for the unmooring of inherited practices from the shared locales of everyday life.

This book examines the intellectual, social, and cultural factors that contributed to the rapid spread of Western tastes and styles, along with the backlash against Westernization that was expressed as a longing for the past. By focusing on the expressions of these desires in popular culture and media texts, it reveals how the conflation of mother, countryside, everyday life, and history structured representations to naturalize ideologies of gender and nationalism.

Written by Jason G. Karlin

2014 | 320 pages | 45 illustrations
ISBN: 978-0-8248-3826-3 | $45.00 | Cloth