Michael French Smith Writes about PNG on Longitude and HuffPost

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UHP AUTHOR INFO


For travelers searching for books and maps about their destination, Longitude has been the go-to resource since 1999. In the July issue of its newsletter highlighting travel to Indonesia, Michael French Smith’s A Faraway, Familiar Place is the featured book for Papua New Guinea and includes an excerpt from his post that appeared earlier on the Longitude blog.

A Faraway, Familiar Place: An Anthropologist Returns to Papua New Guinea is available at a newly reduced price of $35 from UH Press or the Longitude bookstore (where although the price still shows at the original $52, the new price is in effect).

See also Smith’s article on Huffington Post about the political climate and preferential voting system of PNG.

Authors George and Willa Tanabe Honored with JCCH and HHF Awards

On June 21, UH Mānoa professors emeriti George and Willa Tanabe will be honored by the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i with the Spirit of JCCH award, as community leaders who exemplify Japanese American values of Hawai‘i. The award follows last month’s Historic Hawai‘i Foundation recognition of the Tanabes for their book, Japanese Buddhist Temples in Hawai‘i, with a Preservation Media honor award.

There’s still time to reserve a seat at the JCCH Sharing the Spirit of Aloha awards gala, where you can bid on a hardback copy of Japanese Buddhist Temples in Hawai‘i in the silent auction. (We also donated a copy of Shiho Imai’s Creating the Nisei Market, which explores the history and importance of Japanese American merchants in Hawai‘i.)

Congratulations George and Willa!

Photo caption: UH Press executive editor Pat Crosby
joined authors George and Willa Tanabe, and book designer
Julie Matsuo-Chun at the 2014 Historic Hawai‘i Foundation
Preservation Honor awards.

Japanese Buddhist Temples in Hawai‘i: An Illustrated Guide | 2012 | 256 pages
Paper ISBN 978-0-8248-3679-5 | Cloth ISBN 978-0-8248-3663-4

A Wiradjuri’s Tour: Anita Heiss Meets Alice Walker at Sydney Festival; Heads to London, Vienna, and Utrecht Literary Events

Alice Walker and AnitaHeiss
Still aglow from meeting acclaimed novelist/poet Alice Walker at the Sydney Writers Festival, Aboriginal author Anita Heiss headed to London to appear at the inaugural Australian & New Zealand Festival of Literature & Arts and promote her latest “choc-lit” novel, Tiddas (Simon & Schuster Australia). After a talk at Oxford, she flew to Vienna, where she was hosted by the Australian Embassy as the featured speaker in their seminar on the Europe-Australian connection and also gave a presentation similar to her TEDx Brisbane talk at Café Prückel. Thanks to the Austrian-Australian Society and our European distributor, Eurospan, copies of the UH Press edition of Am I Black Enough for You? were available for signing.

Next week, on June 11, Anita will be in Utrecht, Netherlands, to give an evening lecture on indigenous literature at the AAMU, Museum of Contemporary Aboriginal Art. Whew! With a schedule like hers, she is already looking forward to a week’s holiday in Hawai‘i this September—we at UH Press are very much looking forward to her visit and meeting her in person, as well!

Am I Black Enough for You? |2014 | 352 pages 
ISBN: 978-0-8248-4027-3 | Paper | $24.99

A closer look at the orangutan’s history

cribbWildManEVENT | Book Signing
6pm / Thursday, June 5 / Asia Bookroom (Australia)


Wild Man from Borneo: A Cultural History of the Orangutan
written by Robert Cribb, Helen Gilbert, and Helen Tiffin

2014 | 328 pages | 55 illustrations, 2 maps
Cloth | ISBN: 978-0-8248-3714-3 | $54.00

 

“The orangutan population is plummeting with the destruction of their habitat for unsustainable land uses that is only benefiting a greedy few. To save them the more we can tell people about how important the orangutan and their forest habitat is, including telling their cultural history, the more chance we will have of saving the orangutan.” —Leif Cocks, founder of The Orangutan Project

Wild Man from Borneo offers the first comprehensive history of the human-orangutan encounter. Arguably the most humanlike of all the great apes, particularly in intelligence and behavior, the orangutan has been cherished, used, and abused ever since it was first brought to the attention of Europeans in the seventeenth century. The red ape has engaged the interest of scientists, philosophers, artists, and the public at large in a bewildering array of guises that have by no means been exclusively zoological or ecological. One reason for such a long-term engagement with a being found only on the islands of Borneo and Sumatra is that, like its fellow great apes, the orangutan stands on that most uncomfortable dividing line between human and animal, existing, for us, on what has been called “the dangerous edge of the garden of nature.”

RSVP by the 4th of Jun by phone (+61 (0)2 6251 5191) or email Asia Room. Admission by donation to the Orangutan Project.

Waves of Resistance Wins Baldridge Prize for History

Walker-WavesCongratulations to BYU-Hawaii history professor Dr. Isaiah Walker on being awarded the Kenneth W. Baldridge Prize for his book, Waves of Resistance: Surfing and History in Twentieth-Century Hawai‘i. The prize was announced by the Hawai‘i chapter of the Phi Alpha Theta honor society at their annual regional conference held March 8 at the University of Hawai‘i’s Mānoa campus. The Baldridge Prize recognizes the best book in any field of history written by a resident of Hawai‘i.