Dr. Jon Okamura Revisits Japanese American Experiences in Hawai‘i in Ethnic Studies Talk

Okamura@EthnicStudies
AUTHOR EVENT


UH Mānoa professor Jonathan Okamura will speak today, September 30, 3:00–4:15 p.m. at George Hall 301, as part of the Department of Ethnic Studies Fall Colloquium series. He will address select topics from his new book, From Race to Ethnicity: Interpreting Japanese Experiences in Hawai‘i and its relevancy to the most recent primary election.


2014 | 248 pages
Cloth | ISBN 978-0-8248-3950-5 | $42.00
Race and Ethnicity in Hawai‘i

Susan Scott Signs Call Me Captain before Another Sailing Adventure

NEW RELEASE and AUTHOR EVENT


Honolulu Star-Advertiser “Ocean Watch” columnist Susan Scott will appear at BookEnds in Kailua on Saturday, September 27, noon to 1:00 p.m., to sign her newest book, Call Me Captain: A Memoir of a Woman at Sea. This will be a good time to catch her before she leaves a few days later on a sail from New Caledonia to Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, then on to Palau to lead a snorkeling and natural history tour for the Oceanic Society. She’ll return to Hawai‘i in mid-November for the holidays and new year, with a West Coast book tour to follow in February.

Quite different from Susan’s previous guidebooks on Hawai‘i’s marine life, Call Me Captain is a tale of self-discovery when she faces a turning point in her life and marriage and decides to leave everything behind to sail to Palmyra Atoll to work as a volunteer biologist. Follow Susan as she writes about swimming with manta rays, kayaking with sharks, and sailing with whales and dolphins. Her memoir is a romance, a harrowing sea tale, and a personal account of nature’s power to put life in perspective.


Call Me Captain: A Memoir of a Woman at Sea
Susan Scott
2014 | 336 pages | A Latitude 20 Book
Paper | ISBN: 978-0-8248-3981-9 | $19.99

Fighting in Paradise Author Gerald Horne Headlines Third Annual LaborFest Hawai‘i


FREE PUBLIC EVENT


University of Houston historian Dr. Gerald Horne, author of Fighting in Paradise: Labor Unions, Racism, and Communists in the Making of Modern Hawai‘i will lead off the Third Annual LaborFest Hawai‘i held this Friday, September 19, starting at 6:00 p.m. at ARTS at Marks Garage. The gathering will bring together scholars, workers (both union and non-union), organizers, and interested individuals to offer multiple perspectives of working-class culture and celebrate Hawai‘i’s important labor history.

Dr. Horne’s talk will be followed by that of labor journalist/lawyer Steve Early and a panel discussion. Panelists include:

  • William Puette, faculty director of UH West O‘ahu’s Center for Labor Education & Research;
  • Jonathan Dial, Graduate Student Organization advocacy chair;
  • Jim Dator, professor and director of the Hawai‘i Research Center for Futures Studies, UHM Department of Political Science;
  • Susan Schultz, professor of English, University of Hawai’i at Mānoa

Agenda:
6:00 – 6:30 Reception, pupu and music
6:30 – 7:00 Professor Gerald Horne presentation
7:00 – 7:30 Steve Early presentation
7:30 – 8:00 Panel of students, adjunct faculty, professors, teachers and other public workers respond.
8:00 – 8:30 Ray Catania and Bart Dame discuss the fight for a raise in the minimum wage.
8:30 Audience discussion plus resolutions and feedback for the 4th Annual LaborFest Hawaii.

The event is free and open to the public. There will also be a cash bar at the event.

Indigenous Author Anita Heiss to Speak on September 10 at UH-Mānoa

Heiss-Sept10-eventflyer

AUTHOR EVENT


Writer and activist Anita Heiss, a well-known advocate for indigenous education in Australia and one of the leading Aboriginal Australians involved in a highly controversial legal case related to Australia’s Racial Discrimination Act, will give a public talk on Wednesday, September 10, from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. at George Hall Room 227 on the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa campus. Her presentation will be based on her recent memoir, Am I Black Enough for You?, which tells her story of growing up with an Aborigine mother and Austrian father and charts the development of her activist consciousness, including her involvement in the case. She describes and examines her experiences as a modern woman in a country where ethnic and racial identity politics plays a significant role.

The free event is presented by University of Hawai‘i Press and UH Mānoa Department of Ethnic Studies, with cosponsors Center for Pacific Island Studies, Department of Political Science, Department of Anthropology, and Center for Biographical Research. On-campus parking is available for $6 (after 4 p.m.) or free street parking may be available. Click on the image to read the flyer and see the UH calendar for more details.

Denby Fawcett Signs Secrets of Diamond Head: A History and Trail Guide, September 5-6, 2014

Fawcett-SecretsDiamondHead
AUTHOR EVENT


As part of First Friday Hawaii’s Honolulu Art Gallery Walk, on September 5, from 6 to 9 p.m., journalist Denby Fawcett will sign copies of Secrets of Diamond Head: A History and Trail Guide at ARTS at Marks Garage in conjunction with its current “36 Views of Leahi” exhibit. Presented in the spirit of Hokusai’s and Hiroshige’s “Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji,” the exhibit was juried by Masami Teruoka, who selected the best of the submitted art pieces depicting Honolulu’s iconic landmark.

The following day, September 6, at 1:00 p.m., Denby will be at Barnes & Noble, Ala Moana Center, to again autograph her definitive guide to the volcanic crater’s colorful past. To read more about the backstory of Secrets of Diamond Head, which is distributed by UH Press, see Civil Beat‘s August 21 story and the fascinating behind-the-scenes tour of Diamond Head’s tunnels in the Honolulu Star-Advertiser‘s August 13 feature [login required to read the full story].