Defining space in urban China

Al_pb-UHP.indd
NEW RELEASE


Villages in the City: A Guide to South China’s Informal Settlements
edited by Stefan Al

2014 | 216 pages | 300 color illustrations
Paper | ISBN 978-0-8248-4756-2 | $28.00
Not for sale in East Asia, Australia, and New Zealand
Published in association with Hong Kong University Press

 

Villages in the City argues for the value of urban villages as places. To reveal their qualities, a series of drawings and photographs uncover the immense concentration of social life in their dense structures, and provide a peek into residents’ homes and daily lives. Essays by a number of experts give a deeper understanding on the topic, and help imagine how reinstating the focus on the village could lead to a richer, more variegated pathway of urbanization.

 

 

Chinese painter Qi Baishi, new volume and exhibit at Honolulu Museum of Art

EricksonModernInk
NEW RELEASE and EVENT


Modern Ink: The Art of Qi Baishi
written by Britta Erickson, Craig Yee, and Jung Ying Tsao

2014 | 144 pages, 109 color illustrations
Paper | ISBN: 978-0-8248-4766-1 | $38.00
Published in association with Marquand Books and the Mozhai Foundation

Buy-Now-Button

Coinciding with today’s opening of Qi Baishi’s work at the Honolulu Museum of Art, UH Press is releasing an impressive new volume filled with color illustrations of his work.

Born into a poor farming family and coming of age during China’s century of civil strife, Qi Baishi transformed the elite brush art of China’s literati scholars into a universal art form appreciated by people of all social backgrounds. His distinctly modern art language breaks through class and cultural barriers through use of expressive “carved” brushwork, juxtaposition of vibrant colors against deep and rich ink tones, poetic economy in form and composition, and choice of emotionally resonant subject matter. For these reasons, Qi Baishi’s art is the ideal gateway through which art lovers of any class or culture can learn about the millenia-old tradition of Chinese brush painting.

The exhibition closes on January 25, 2015.

National cinema and utopic vision in Chinese film

wangRemaking
NEW RELEASE | First in Paper


Remaking Chinese Cinema: Through the Prism of Shanghai, Hong Kong, and Hollywood
written by Yiman Wang

2013 | 232 pages
Paper | ISBN 978-0-8248-5107-1 | $27.00
Cloth | ISBN 978-0-8248-3607-8 | $49.00
Critical Interventions

“Yiman Wang establishes new paradigms for studying Chinese cinema. Tracing how films were adapted and remade across borders from the 1930s to the present, the book demonstrates the strong bonds among film industries in the Pacific rim, and especially among Chinese-speaking countries. Wang contributes to the cutting-edge field of Sinophone studies, which challenges the notion of cinemas defined by the nation-state. Wang brings rare expertise as she straddles China studies and film studies, drawing on theories of national formation and film reception. The book relies on rich archival research in China, Hong Kong, and the U.S. and should be read by all interested in the transnational circulation of words and images.” —Yomi Braester, University of Washington

Coordinating history through East Asia’s maps // China, Korea, and Japan revealed

peggCartographic
NEW RELEASE


Cartographic Traditions in East Asian Maps
written by Richard A. Pegg

2014 | 140 pages | 130 color illustrations
Cloth | ISBN 978-0-8248-4765-4 | $40.00
Published in association with MacLean Collection

 

Cartographic Traditions in East Asian Maps is focused on a group of maps from the MacLean Collection, one of the world’s largest private collections of maps. Included are are eighteenth and nineteenth-century maps from the late Qing dynasty in China, the Joseon dynasty in Korea and the Edo and Meiji periods in Japan illustrating late traditions in the region’s history. This book provides some of the particular practices and relationships between text and image in East Asian map making that are unique in world cartography. Often particular map making characteristics are not recognized as unique within their own cultural contexts, and so it is only through the process of comparing and contrasting that these qualities emerge. This survey of selected maps proves extremely useful in revealing certain similarities and distinctive differences in the representations of space, both real and imagined, in early modern cartographic traditions of China, Korea and Japan.

From Fu Manchu to Kung Fu Panda: Images of China in American Film

GreeneCOVER1.inddThroughout the twentieth century, American filmmakers have embraced cinematic representations of China. Beginning with D.W. Griffith’s silent classic Broken Blossoms (1919) and ending with the computer-animated Kung Fu Panda (2008), author Naomi Greene explores China’s changing role in the American imagination. Taking viewers into zones that frequently resist logical expression or more orthodox historical investigation, the films suggest the welter of intense and conflicting impulses that have surrounded China. They make clear that China has often served as the very embodiment of “otherness”—a kind of yardstick or cloudy mirror of America itself. It is a mirror that reflects not only how Americans see the racial “other” but also a larger landscape of racial, sexual, and political perceptions that touch on the ways in which the nation envisions itself and its role in the world.

In the United States, the exceptional emotional charge that imbues images of China has tended to swing violently from positive to negative and back again: China has been loved and—as is generally the case today—feared. Using film to trace these dramatic fluctuations, From Fu Manchu to Kung Fu Panda relates them to the larger arc of historical and political change. Suggesting that filmic images both reflect and fuel broader social and cultural impulses, the author argues that they reveal a constant tension or dialectic between the “self” and the “other.” Significantly, with the important exception of films made by Chinese or Chinese American directors, the Chinese other is almost invariably portrayed in terms of the American self. Placed in a broader context, this ethnocentrism is related both to an ever-present sense of American exceptionalism and to a Manichean world view that perceives other countries as friends or enemies.

Greene analyzes a series of influential films, including classics like Shanghai Express (1932), The Bitter Tea of General Yen (1933), The Good Earth (1936), and Shanghai Gesture (1941); important cold war films such as The Manchurian Candidate (1962) and The Sand Pebbles (1966); and a range of contemporary films, including Chan is Missing (1982), The Wedding Banquet (1993), Kundun (1997), Mulan (1998), and Shanghai Noon (2000). The author’s consideration makes clear that while many stereotypes and racist images of the past have been largely banished from the screen, the political, cultural, and social impulses they embodied are still alive and well.

Written by Naomi Greene

2014 | 280 pages | 31 illustrations
Paper ISBN: 978-0-8248-3836-2 | $25.00
Cloth ISBN: 978-0-8248-3835-5 | $65.00

Critical Interventions Series